CRYENGINE | The complete solution for next generation game development by Crytek https://www.cryengine.com/ The most powerful game development platform for you and your team to create world-class entertainment experiences. en-US Copyright 2020, Crytek GmbH. Fri, 18 Sep 2020 11:14:46 +0200 Mon, 21 Sep 2020 12:00:20 +0200 60 <![CDATA[Crysis Remastered Out Now for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crysis-remastered-out-now-for-pc-playstation-4-and-xbox-one

Crytek is pleased to announce that Crysis Remastered is out now for PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4. The remaster of the seminal first-person shooter was developed and optimized in partnership with Saber Interactive, and follows the launch of Crysis Remastered for Nintendo Switch. Crysis Remastered is available as a digital release via the Epic Games Store, the PlayStation Store, the Microsoft Store, and the Nintendo eShop for USD 29.99 / EUR 29.99. Players who buy the game within the first three weeks from launch on the Epic Games Store will also receive a Crysis soundtrack and wallpaper. Gamers who buy Crysis Remastered within the same period on the PlayStation Store will receive a Crysis Remastered PlayStation Theme as a launch bonus.

“Our aim was to upgrade the visual fidelity for a wide range of PCs and to use all the technical capabilities of current-gen consoles while offering the same great gameplay that Crysis is known for,” said Steffen Halbig, Project Lead. “Naturally, we are thrilled to invite a new generation of players to suit up and experience Crysis, upgraded and remastered to take advantage of today’s hardware and advances in CRYENGINE.”

Crysis Remastered features the all-action, sandbox single-player gameplay from the acclaimed shooter, upgraded with remastered graphics, including high-quality textures, improved art assets, and more. For the first time this console generation, Crytek’s software-based ray tracing comes to PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X. On PC, CRYENGINE’s hardware-agnostic technology brings ray tracing to a wide-range of contemporary GPUs. Additionally, Crysis Remastered supports hardware-based ray tracing using NVIDIA’s VKRay Vulkan extension on launch and NVIDIA® DLSS technology will be added soon, for NVIDIA® GeForce® RTX GPU.

In Crysis Remastered, players face down an alien invasion, armed with a powerful Nanosuit which provides strength, armor, speed, and cloaking abilities. Gamers choose their own path as they fight through the open world of Crysis, destroying obstacles, driving vehicles, and using a huge armory of modular weaponry to dominate enemies on ever-changing battlefields.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crysis-remastered-out-now-for-pc-playstation-4-and-xbox-one Fri, 18 Sep 2020 11:14:46 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[The Climb 2 announced for Oculus Quest]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/the-climb-2-announced-for-oculus-quest

Frankfurt am Main (Germany), September 17th, 2020 – Today, Crytek announced that The Climb 2, powered by CRYENGINE, will come to Oculus Quest platform this holiday season. Players will embark on a new rock climbing adventure developed exclusively for VR in the sequel to Crytek’s award-winning original game, The Climb, which was released in 2016. The Climb 2 will introduce a new city setting alongside mountainous environments and will invite gamers to find their path to the top of 15 maps.  

Fatih Özbayram, Senior Producer, said: “We're delighted to bring The Climb 2 to Oculus Quest. This sequel builds upon a lot of ideas we had during the production of the original game, and we're especially excited about players scaling huge skyscrapers in a new urban environment."

Players will experience breathtaking vistas and feel the adrenaline of climbing without ropes as they ascend epic peaks, navigate vast caves, climb buildings, and discover hidden shortcuts. The game's maps are spread across mountainous settings inspired by real-world locations in Europe, The USA, and Southeast Asia plus a brand new city environment. The Climb 2 also includes The North, an expansion to the original game, which is set in the Arctic.

Gamers will be able to compete for the top spot on leaderboards, challenge friends by racing their ghosts in asynchronous multiplayer and participate in new events. Each of the game's beautiful environments can be explored at the player's own pace in Tourist mode using simplified mechanics. The Climb 2 also includes a practice wall for players to hone their skills and a range of achievements to unlock, which will reward players with in-game gloves and watches.

For more information about The Climb 2, visit www.oculus.com/climb2 or www.theclimbgame.com.

About Crytek 

Crytek is an independent videogame developer, publisher, and technology provider dedicated to pushing the boundaries of gaming with its cutting-edge 3D game development solution CRYENGINE. Headquartered in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Crytek has created multiple award-winning titles, including the original Far Cry, the Crysis series, Ryse: Son of Rome, The Climb, Robinson: The Journey, and Hunt: Showdown. Crytek delivers fun and innovative gaming experiences for PC, consoles, and VR and continues to grow its reach in the games-as-a-service market. Every Crytek game is created with CRYENGINE, which can be used by anyone to develop games.

For more information, visit www.crytek.com and www.cryengine.com.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/the-climb-2-announced-for-oculus-quest Thu, 17 Sep 2020 16:04:32 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Meet the Team: Theodor Mader, Technical Director]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-theodor-mader-technical-director

We chat with Theodor Mader, CRYENGINE’s Technical Director, about his history in game development, his vision for the engine, and some of the new features coming to CRYENGINE, including mobile support and ray tracing technology. Grab a coffee, have a read, and discover the future of CRYENGINE.

Hey Theodor, thanks for joining us. Can you tell us a bit about your background and your history with CRYENGINE?

My story with games technology began with studying computer science at ETH Zurich. Amongst many other things, I discovered computer graphics, my true passion. It was around this time that I first heard of the incredibly impressive video games Far Cry and Crysis. So I decided to pursue this direction, and after spending a couple of years working at a Canadian video game developer, HB Studios, I found my home at Crytek.

What was your journey to the position of Technical Director?

I joined Crytek in 2012 as a rendering engineer on the Xbox One launch title, Ryse: Son of Rome. After shipping the game, I transitioned into the rendering team of the core engine group, where I had the chance to learn from some of the best minds in the games industry. In 2018 I became the leader of the CRYENGINE rendering team, and earlier this year, I took on the role of Technical Director for CRYENGINE.

As Technical Director, what’s your overall vision for the engine going forward?

We currently focus heavily on bringing CRYENGINE to the mobile domain. Our goal is to give users the tools to bring their games to mobile devices, with the quality and visual fidelity CRYENGINE is known for. As a first step, we are focusing on the Android ecosystem, and we are working closely together with Google, ARM, and Qualcomm to ensure the best experience possible on compatible devices. Preparations to further expand into the Apple universe are also underway.

Another core focus is the general accessibility of CRYENGINE. We are always improving the user experience of our Sandbox editor tool and connected developer workflows. The new Visual Scripting system is also designed from the ground up for easy usage and extensibility for game developers.

And last but not least, we are also paying attention to improving the CRYENGINE code, stability, and performance. A large code base like CRYENGINE needs continuous maintenance to keep up with the latest updates to programming languages and compilers, and hardware trends like an increased number of CPU cores, fast storage mediums, and hardware-accelerated ray tracing all need to be supported.

We did update the CRYENGINE roadmap today alongside this interview. Considering past and present updates, which features you most excited about?

With the next CRYENGINE release, we are planning to release the GPU-independent, software-based ray tracing solution we first presented in our GDC 2019 Neon Noir demo and is now shipping in Crysis Remastered. With this technology, content creators will be able to render ray-traced reflections in real-time across a variety of platforms, thereby increasing the realism of their games.

We’re also adding specialized hardware support to our custom ray tracing solution. It allows us to use dedicated ray tracing hardware like RT cores to speed up parts of the CRYENGINE ray tracing pipeline, for example, in the ray-world intersection stage. The performance gains can subsequently be leveraged by simply shooting more rays in the same time budget, or by increasing quality elsewhere in the rendering pipeline. It’s essentially down to the engine users to decide.

Another exciting feature is displacement brushes. They are a new type of terrain painting tool which allows users to paint terrain with a predefined height map. It can speed up terrain creation workflows significantly by creating highly detailed brushes once and then simply applying them to larger terrain areas.

The next CRYENGINE release will come with a large number of new features and improvements, but the area I'm most excited about is the new mobile platform support. It represents a big step forward for CRYENGINE, expanding its reach to an entirely new ecosystem and I'm very excited to see what kind of games developers will come up with.

What does CRYENGINE bring to developers on mobile devices? Can you give us an update on how things are progressing?

Our goal is to empower developers on mobile platforms to deliver outstanding visuals and immersive games, and we are making it a top priority to ensure that CRYENGINE created content runs optimally. We are, for example, in the process of adding customized rendering pipelines for high-end mobile devices, which provide a visually rich experience for powerful devices. On the other side of the spectrum, we are adding a mobile VR rendering pipeline, which is highly optimized to render stereo images at 72 frames per second.

For the Apple ecosystem, we already have initial prototypes of the core engine running on iOS. Bringing the entire CRYENGINE toolkit to the Apple environments is a challenging task, though. We need to make sure that our Sandbox editor and various other tools, for example, the resource compiler, will run on macOS and that the core user experience matches the expectations in this environment.

There’s a lot going on! Do you have any time to play games anymore?

I mostly play games with my kids! For instance, Mario Kart, Unravel, Little Nightmares, and Portal, just to name a few.

Cheers, Theodor!

As ever, we look forward to your feedback in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-theodor-mader-technical-director Tue, 15 Sep 2020 16:00:28 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Crysis Remastered brings ray tracing to current-gen consoles]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crysis-remastered-brings-ray-tracing-to-current-gen-consoles

Crysis Remastered, powered by CRYENGINE, is bringing ray tracing to new platforms. On PC, players can experience software and hardware based ray tracing in Crysis Remastered, including, for the very first time, software based ray tracing for AMD GPUs. And in another first, current generation console gamers can enjoy ray tracing on PS4 Pro and Xbox One X when Crysis Remastered launches on Friday, September 18th. Ray tracing is an advanced rendering technique that simulates the way rays of light behave in real life, creating lifelike lighting, reflections, and shadows in scenes. This groundbreaking technology will also be made available to all CRYENGINE users in a future version of the engine.

You can find out more about CRYENGINE’s ray tracing technology in our latest video:

Crysis Remastered is an excellent showcase for our unique ray tracing technology thanks to its sandbox levels filled with water and oceans, which all reflect beautifully. You’ll also see the power of ray tracing on reflective surfaces in the game like glass, metal, weapons, and more. On PC, we push things further with higher reflection resolutions, and character and skinning reflections.

Traditional ray tracing techniques will push even high-end PCs to their limits, and previously ray tracing was a technique that was exclusive to offline renderers. However, because CRYENGINE’s ray tracing solution is API and hardware agnostic, highly modifiable, and can be made very efficient, it will run on today’s consoles and current generation GPUs. The technology also runs in real-time. Unlike RTX ray tracing, it’s not dependent on RTX cores, so thanks to the power of CRYENGINE, Crysis Remastered will be the first current-gen console game to feature ray tracing. On PC, our ray tracing solution will be enhanced by more powerful graphics cards, including Nvidia’s latest range of hardware.

The road to ray tracing began with our Neon Noir Tech demo, now available as a ray tracing benchmark for PC from the CRYENGINE Marketplace, which allows you to find out whether your rig can run ray tracing. The demo shows how ray tracing can deliver sharp reflections like mirrors and self-reflection on highly reflective surfaces, rendering cases that are complicated to achieve with SSR (Screen Space Reflections) or cube maps. In the future, we will also use ray tracing for soft shadows, ambient occlusion, and more.

Experience the power of ray tracing by playing Crysis Remastered when it launches on September 18th.

Register for our CRYENGINE beta program to enjoy our engine’s latest features first.

We look forward to your feedback on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crysis-remastered-brings-ray-tracing-to-current-gen-consoles Fri, 11 Sep 2020 17:05:47 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Launch your project with free space assets!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/launch-your-project-with-free-space-assets

The CRYENGINE Marketplace is home to a huge range of engine-ready assets ready to drop into your scenes. Today, we're checking out a selection of free assets, perfect for all kinds of adventures into outer space.

The NASA Perseverance Rover (Mars 2020) is a true to scale 3D model of the Perseverance rover launched by NASA on July 30, 2020, and scheduled to land in Jezero crater on the Red Planet on February 18, 2021. The rover's mission is to seek out and identify signs of ancient life and return to Earth. What will your players discover with it?

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Once referred to as the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO)is a flagship-class space telescope launched back in 1999. It's been beautifully converted and optimized for CRYENGINE, ready to orbit your scenes.

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If you feel like reaching for the sun with your project, the Parker Solar Probe might be the ideal asset for you. This true to scale 3D model was named after renowned physicist Eugene Newman Parker before it set off on its mission in 2018.

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Feeling a little curious? Then be sure to grab the Curiosity Rover (MSL) and set it off on an epic journey of exploration and discovery in your own game. This model is embellished with dirt, conveying the fact that this rover is still roaming around on the surface of Mars.

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WarpSpeed teleports us all the way back to 1999 yet again with a stunningly converted and optimized rendition of Lockheed's robotic space probe that was sent into space to collect dust samples from the Wild 2 comet. Download the Stardust – Space Probe for free today.

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If you find yourself out in the far reaches of outer space in desperate need of phoning home, or you just want a meticulously crafted satellite dish to hand in your asset folder, then be sure you add this expertly replicated Sat Dish 70m – Deep Space Network (DSN) asset to your game today. You can also grab a satellite dish in a downsized, 34-meter version.

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The Voyager – Space Probe is one of the more veteran probes in this collection of space-themed assets up for grabs on the CRYENGINE marketplace right now. The Voyager was sent to space back in 1977 (the same year Star Wars hit screens, believe it or not) and is still zipping through space on its journey of discovery.

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GalaxSys is a pulse-pounding twin-stick shooter developed by a foursome of developers here at CRYENGINE, including VFX/3D Artist/Level Designer, Viktor Ikkes, Gameplay Programmer/Gameplay Mechanics Designer, Alex Klinger, Audio designer/Producer, Chris Schilling, and Gameplay Programmer/UI Designer, Jeremy Wade.

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We sat down and talked with Alex and Jeremy to find out more about the project on our blog. The duo provides plenty of tips on how to get the most out of investigating the sample project.

Once you're done reading all about, grab it from the CRYENGINE Marketplace and give the game a whirl before expanding or reimagining it in whichever way you desire.

And for all the important info on the GalaxSys Sample Project head over to the GalaxSys Documentation page for more on the team's beautiful, rapidly-created twin-stick shooter.

You will get the most out of this sample project if you are already comfortable with using CRYENGINE. If you are entirely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend you download our beginner's course or check out our introductory YouTube playlist.

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We can't wait to see what you can do with these assets. If you're making something cool with CRYENGINE, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/launch-your-project-with-free-space-assets Wed, 02 Sep 2020 16:00:32 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Hunt: Showdown x Marvelous Designer Fan Art Contest highlights]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-showdown-x-marvelous-designer-fan-art-contest-highlights

Do you fancy showing off your art skills and winning some fantastic prizes? Our Hunt: Showdown 3D Apparel Creation Contest, hosted by Marvelous Designer, is running until September 15, so there’s still time to get your entries in. All you have to do is design and screenshot your best hunter outfits and garments, and you could win swag, including NVIDIA graphics cards, perpetual Marvelous Designer licenses, and more. Marvelous Designer from CLO Virtual Fashion is a realistic cloth making program for 3D artists with a free 30-day trial. We have released a free asset pack on the CRYENGINE Marketplace containing everything you need to make garments for this contest, and you can check out our tutorial featuring a practical workflow to get you up and running. If you’re having any issues with downloading the assets, or want to pick up some advice, join our community on the official CRYENGINE Discord channel and sign up to the Marvelous Designer Discord channel.

Today, we’re catching up with two members of our CRYENGINE community, Dowon Choi and Ante Lovrić, who share their tips and tricks about crafting an entry for this contest. Head to the contest website to find out more about how to enter, and get first-hand advice in our Q&A below.

Hey guys, thanks for joining us! What’s your background with CRYENGINE?

Dowon: I live in South Korea, and I have worked on CG in various fields. My major is in modeling and concept art. I first learned about CRYENGINE in 2010 when I was at college. Pre-visualization research for the production of films was being conducted at the faculty where I was studying.

At that time, there was a project to incorporate the CRYENGINE sandbox as a pre-visualization tool. I was able to experience the powerful real-time visualization capabilities of the engine for the first time while working on that project. It was a period when real-time rendering was not very well developed, so I built up a lot of interest in CRYENGINE. I really appreciated the future and potential of real-time rendering and since then, CRYENGINE has become central to my work.

Most of my work with CRYENGINE is environment creation, and I like large-scale landscapes such as snow-capped mountains and deserts. CRYENGINE provides excellent functions for expressing my visions!

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  • Ante's contest entry is reminiscent of the iconic European plague doctor tradition to wear a beak-like mask, common during pandemics in the 17th, 18th &19th century in Europe.

Ante: I am from Croatia, from a small town in the region of Dalmatia called Sinj. The first time that I experienced CRYENGINE was back in 2008 when I got my hands on Crysis 1. It had a huge impact on gaming, especially for its graphics, and it was a game that marked my childhood. At the time, I was still very young, so I had no idea how the games were being made, but I knew that I wanted to make one for myself! Time went on, and I learned more and more about the game-making process.

Not long after, I finally had the chance to start making clothing mods for games such as Skyrim and Fallout. I was also invited to join in on Fallout 4: London, a fan-made DLC for the game. There were a lot of talented, experienced people, but also some who were beginners. It was an opportunity for me to learn from those that were better than me, and give tips about the process of making garments, optimization, texturing to the guys that were just starting out.

Last year my friends were talking about this game, Hunt: Showdown, which they got addicted to. They persuaded me to buy it and join in with them, and I enjoyed it a lot! When I started the game, I heard the crows flying in the loading screen and someone whispering "CRYENGINE." That’s when I knew this game is a big deal!

Now I had a lot more knowledge about 3D modeling and texturing, and the Hunt Contest came up just at the right time! This was the first time that I got the opportunity to test out CRYENGINE and its amazing features. I've been using the engine for about two months now, and it was a great learning experience. The community is friendly and helpful, devs were available nearly all the time, which is rare nowadays, and they have my respect for that. There are excellent streams to help us learn and the devs answer almost every single question that we ask of them!

Check out the model on sketchfab!

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What was the inspiration for your entry?

Ante: I was inspired by H.P Lovecraft’s gothic and cosmic horror stories. I was also inspired by the game Bloodborne, and in particular a character named Eileen the Crow, a hunter of hunters. I came up with the idea of making something Bloodborne-ish for the contest. I also did a little bit of research on what people on the Hunt Discord wanted to see. Many wanted to see a plague doctor hunter, so I made one for them to see how it would look inside of the game.

The support that I received was overwhelming, and it encouraged me to refine it further and make it look better. I knew that most people would try to make hoods, capes, bandoliers filled with bullets, and so on, so I wanted to make a character that would stand out from the crowd. It is a character that cares about his fashion rather than anything else, and by looking at his posture, it can be seen that he is a gentleman, wanting to separate himself from the other hunters in Bayou. There is a mysterious sickness, or a plague going on in Louisiana, turning people into mindless husks thirsting for human flesh. The plague doctor is here to find out what is causing it and to prevent it!

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  • Dowon's entry is inspired by traditional Korean hunter garments of the 1900s - including the iconic gat hat.
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Dowon: Although Hunt: Showdown is set in the south of the United States in the 1900s, I tried to change the idea to what it would look like in my country. The concept of Hunt is mainly a hunter who hunts a supernatural or realistic threat. Korea is a mountainous area and has been threatened by tigers since ancient times. The tiger has long been called the “Lord of the Mountain” and is an element in many myths. Therefore, for a long time, there have been groups belonging to the royal family that specialize in hunting tigers using bows and spears.

In the 1900s, in Korea, exchanges with foreign countries began in earnest, and so bows and spears for catching tigers were turned into guns and bombs. I decided to borrow some of the regional and periodic points of this time. So, I wanted to incorporate the image of a traditional hunter using a gun to hunt 'monsters' into Hunt: Showdown. Although I couldn't set up multiple and really deep concepts because I couldn't afford to spend a lot of time in the contest, I kept the concept simple and focused on expressing the required form.

Although armed with advanced gunpowder weapons and equipment, efforts have been made to keep the old Korean clothing somewhat maintained. I tried to balance it so that it was not too modern or too ancient. For example, leather boots were commonly by soldiers at the time, while the top was in the form of a traditional burlap material, but it also showed a slightly western long coat form.

I wanted a traditional Korean piece to finish my work, so I chose the gat, a traditional-style hat. If you've ever seen the Korean drama 'Kingdom' on Netflix, you've seen a lot of cool gats!

Do you have any tips for fellow community members who want to enter?

Dowon: If you try to create a strong image with too many parts or elements, the overall appearance may be too complicated and confusing. If you've added a lot of detail to one aspect, it's a good idea to balance the other part with a simple form. If the shape is complex, the detail of the surface can be simple. And if the shape is simple, filling in the details, for example, by using patterns, gives good visual guidance. Elements like buttons and stitches that are small or subtle can be exaggerated in size compared to the real thing to give a better visual impression.

Ante: I'd suggest getting familiar with Marvelous Designer! It has a free trial and helpful tutorials that can improve your garment making process. I'd also recommend learning more about poly count and optimization. Most of the characters in games are made with around 15k faces, so it is always wise to make a low poly model and a high poly one. All of those details that you see in professional models aren't really part of the mesh model but are made out of textures that are tricking your eyes into seeing surface details that aren't actually there. That is done by baking the normal map of a detailed high poly model, one that has wrinkles, scars, stitches, and other details onto a low poly one. This means that you can have an optimized model with a low poly count that looks like it is a high poly model that can be used in your games.

I would recommend using up to three texture sets for their entire model and combining the parts rather than using one texture set for every single part. This will pay off later in the performance of the game, and your texture sets won’t have an absurd file size, which can go up to a couple of gigabytes if a lot of texture sets are being used! Also, not everything on your model has to be in 4k. Use 4k textures only on the pieces that you are proud of, and want to draw attention to. Tiny details can be done with textures of a much lower resolution, and still look great on your model.

If parts of your model are transparent once you put them in the engine, like if someone looks inside of the sleeves of your shirt, or coat, try adding thickness to the edges of your model to cover it up. There is no need for you to make an entire model thick, as it will result in a much higher poly count for no reason. Also, make sure to delete the parts of your character's body that are covered up with the clothing. It will be much more optimized, and those parts won't be visible anyway.

What are your favorite features in CRYENGINE?

Dowon: My favorite feature is the real-time GI function in SVOTI.  I think that it is excellent for building realistic lighting easily and quickly, and puts only a small burden on specifications. I am looking forward to the upgrade of the ray-traced reflection in the future. I also love the time of day settings functions and the designer tools that allow you to create white boxes within the editor quickly. The shaders have all the necessary functions without requiring any additional programming modifications, and that’s another advantage of CRYENGINE. I think CRYENGINE is a perfect tool for artists.

Ante: My favorite feature would be the lighting because of how nice the textures look once they are lit by the projector light or the sun. It makes the specular map look amazing, adding more to the depth of the scene. I also like the rain. The rain looks terrific, and everything about it can be customized. I spent a lot of time playing around with it, adding more puddles, adjusting the speed, and making the scene as scary as it can be. Another of my favorite features is volumetric fog. It looks so good once you get to see the sun rays piercing through it. And once again, everything about it is entirely customizable and easy to adjust.

The best thing about CRYENGINE, in my opinion, is how easy it is to set up a beautiful looking scene without needing any programming knowledge. It is a great thing for artists!

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How has the CRYENGINE community helped you on your game dev journey?

Dowon: I am always learning from the community, and especially on the Discord channel, which is really great because I can get help with difficulties quickly. Big thanks to the guys on there, because there are always 'hidden experts` in the community! The same goes for the Crytek staff. On Discord, information and feedback can be learned quickly, so I recommend that you sign up!

Ante: There were a lot of members from the community that helped me, and I really appreciate all of the time and patience they showed me. I want to thank CRY-Nic for being there and supporting me. Always friendly and a nice guy that was always ready to answer any questions that I had, and even encouraging me to start doing what I really like! He was a big inspiration, a person that made me start following my dreams, and I'll be forever grateful. Nic is MVP! :)

I would also like to thank CRY-Josh for taking his time to explain to me how to handle materials, and how to import textures into CRYENGINE, a great guy! I would also like to thank VinnieMc for explaining to me how transparency works in CRYENGINE. All of those torn clothing details would not be possible without him! He is also a great guy who helps everyone, and I appreciate his help!

Cheers, guys!

We hope that these insights have inspired you, and we can’t wait to see what you come up with. Don’t forget that you can connect with us and fellow devs on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-showdown-x-marvelous-designer-fan-art-contest-highlights Wed, 26 Aug 2020 16:01:09 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Crytek Announces Release Date for Crysis Remastered]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crytek-announces-release-date-for-crysis-remastered

Frankfurt (Germany), August 21, 2020 – Hot on the heels of its Nintendo Switch release, Crytek announced today that Crysis Remastered is coming to PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4 on September 18th. The game will be available as a digital release via the Epic Games Store, the PlayStation Store, and the Microsoft Store for USD 29.99 / EUR 29.99.

Co-developed with Saber Interactive, the classic first person shooter will focus on the original game’s single-player campaigns and is slated to contain high-quality textures up to 8K, HDR support, temporal anti-aliasing, Screen Space Directional Occlusion (SSDO), Global Illumination (SVOGI), state-of-the-art depth fields, new light settings, motion blur, parallax occlusion mapping, Screen Space Reflections and Shadows (SSR & SSS) as well as new and updated particle effects and more. Further additions such as ray tracing enhance the game with a major visual upgrade.

For the first time a Crytek game will feature ray tracing on Xbox One X and PlayStation 4 Pro powered by CRYENGINE’s proprietary software based ray tracing solution. The PC version will additionally support NVIDIA® DLSS technology and hardware-based ray tracing using NVIDIA’s VKRay Vulkan extension, for NVIDIA® GeForce® RTX GPU.

In Crysis, what begins as a simple rescue mission becomes the battleground of a new war as alien invaders swarm over a North Korean island chain. Armed with a powerful Nanosuit, players can become invisible to stalk enemy patrols, or boost strength to lay waste to vehicles. The Nanosuit’s speed, strength, armor, and cloaking allow creative solutions for every kind of fight, while a huge arsenal of modular weaponry provides unprecedented control over play style. In the ever-changing environment, adapt tactics and gear to dominate your enemies, in an enormous sandbox world.

For more information visit www.crysis.com

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crytek-announces-release-date-for-crysis-remastered Fri, 21 Aug 2020 17:21:36 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE is on Twitch!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-is-on-twitch

We're delighted to invite you to join us over on our official CRYENGINE Twitch channel, launching today to coincide with devcom. Our first stream will be today, August 17, at 17:00 GMT +2, and your host will be Roman Perezogin, Junior Technical Designer for CRYENGINE, aka Cry-Journey. He will be presenting the first of ten sessions as part of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy, running through to August 30. Our Twitch channel lets you watch streams from CRYENGINE experts, covering a range of different topics about our engine and game development in general, so like and follow us on Twitch and invite your friends to join us too.

The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is kicking off our Twitch launch, with ten live sessions in which we will build a game from scratch together. We'll have hosts and special guests guiding you every step of the way and sharing their expertise and real-world stories. The sessions will cover all the tools and features in the engine that you need to create a full game. We'll also be hosting a special animation AMA. We will be running six sessions this week, and you can check out the schedule below: 

• Session 1 - The Journey Begins - Gameplay and concepting: 17 Aug, 17:00 - 18:30 GMT +2

• Session 2 - Platforming is a Breeze - Gameplay programming in C++:  18 Aug, 17:00 - 18:30 GMT +2

• Session 3 - Blend your Spaces - Making your character move:  August 19, 17:00 - 18:30 GMT +2

• Session 4 – CRYENGINE Animation AMA - What makes CRYENGINE's animation system special and what's planned for the future?: 21 Aug, 16:00 - 17:30 GMT +2

• Session 5 – Low-Poly Art Styles - Fill your levels with life using the CryDesigner Tool and Blender assets for a simplistic art style: August 22, 16:00 - 17:30 GMT +2

• Session 6 - The Art of Lighting - How artificial 3D spaces need really good photon perception emulation:  August 23, 16:00 - 17:30 GMT +2

If you're signed up for devcom, you can also join via the Pine app. The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is just one element of our participation in this year's digital devcom conference. You can also connect with us via our virtual booth, and of course, participate in a range of networking opportunities to connect with fellow devs and watch talks from industry experts. It's not too late to sign up, so register here.

We can't wait for you to join us on Twitch, so stop by, say hi, subscribe, and let's make a game together!

We look forward to your feedback on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel for our latest tutorials. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-is-on-twitch Mon, 17 Aug 2020 16:39:48 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Join us as devcom 2020 goes digital]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/join-us-as-devcom-2020-goes-digital

Sadly, we can’t be present to meet you at devcom this year. However, we are delighted to launch the CRYENGINE Summer Academy as part of a comprehensive range of talks and learning opportunities at devcom digital 2020. And you’ll also be able to meet with us virtually at our new digital booth! Taking place from August 17 to August 30, devcom digital will feature over 100 speakers, 60 dedicated talks, two digital expos, and it will all be broadcast to the comfort of your own home via the Pine app.

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We’re proud to be involved in this fantastic event, which acts as an online global hub for the worldwide game development community, and features expert talks and networking opportunities with experienced game devs. Ticket prices begin at just 40 Euro for students, so get involved, get online, and connect with Crytek staff members and attend an amazing schedule of live CRYENGINE virtual learning sessions. Devcom offers rooms to virtually connect with industry veterans and peers, features 100+ talks and other exciting events as well as a job fair and many more virtual booths with exhibitors.

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A new format for the conference requires a new approach, so let’s give you some more details about our new CRYENGINE Summer Academy, which will run during devcom 2020.  Our program will be hosted by Learning Manager, Brian Dilg, and Roman Perezogin, a former indie game developer and one of our Junior Technical Designers. Alongside a range of experienced CRYENGINE developers, engineers, and special guests, they will present a variety of practical and approachable workshops covering different aspects of CRYENGINE and game development. You can get in touch during the stream or even schedule a meeting at our digital booth when you are attending devcom.

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Ten live streaming sessions are planned, where we build a game from scratch together; each featuring a guest of honor to share their real-world expertise, and real-world stories, covering the tools and features of our engine that will help you achieve your vision.  From absolute beginners to more experienced developers, the CRYENGINE Summer Academy will arm you with industry-standard techniques accompanied by insight from experts in their fields. We’ll be covering everything from your first steps with the engine to designing gameplay mechanics, lighting, modeling, adding audio, debugging, and tips and tricks around marketing and publishing for indie developers.

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During devcom 2020, we’ll also be launching our official CRYENGINE Twitch channel as a new way to interact with the community and our staff. Stay tuned for more details on that.

Head over to https://www.devcom.global/ for all the details, and get registered for what promises to be a great new format for this leading games conference.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more details and the latest updates from CRYENGINE, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/join-us-as-devcom-2020-goes-digital Thu, 13 Aug 2020 16:01:14 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Master environments in CRYENGINE]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/master-environments-in-cryengine-2

Our Learning Manager Brian Dilg presents the next video in our environment editor series, which provides you with the skills to make beautiful worlds in CRYENGINE. In this tutorial, you will learn how to how to balance the final look of your game by creating a custom color grade using Photoshop. Brian also shows you how to design lighting in the engine to get the most out of what color grading can provide without degrading your image. The video explains where color grading fits in the render pipeline, best practices in Photoshop, color management, how to export a customized lookup table, and multiple methods of applying it to a level in CRYENGINE.

You can also follow along with the tutorial by using our comprehensive written documentation.

If you are new to the series, we recommend you start at the beginning! The series opens with an overview of the environment editor and then shows you how to master volumetric fog and use SVOGI and ambient lighting. You will also learn how to use HDR and filter post-production effects. Each tutorial is accompanied by written documentation.

You can download two free asset packs from the CRYENGINE Marketplace which accompany the course.

The Environment Presets Pack

Thirteen environment presets covering a range of environment and time of day styles, from dawn to dusk. Scenes include:

A simple, clear night with a low moon in the sky

  • A full 24-hour day/night cycle
  • A simulated infrared camera view with a green tint, heavy grain and bloom, and limited depth of field

The Terrain Example Pack

This pack includes three diverse scenes to use in conjunction with the tutorials:

  • Huge craters in a desolate, rough landscape
  • An island of steep mountains and a rugged valley
  • Dramatic mountains and deep valleys with a river and roads carved through them

To get the most out of these tutorials, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/master-environments-in-cryengine-2 Tue, 11 Aug 2020 16:00:31 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Teaching game development to kids with CRYENGINE]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/teaching-game-development-to-kids-with-cryengine

Omar Ocasio, CEO of Valkyrie Game Studios based in Fresno, California, is a well-established member of our CRYENGINE community. He shared his passion for our engine and game development by teaching kids aged 10 to 17 how to make games. Omar set up a week-long course, where students learned for five hours a day in a socially distanced class, for innoved, a Science Technology Engineering and Math academic enrichment center. We spoke to Omar about how his students got on. Can kids learn CRYENGINE? Find out below…

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Hey, Omar! Thanks for joining us. So what’s your background with CRYENGINE?

My history with CRYENGINE goes all the way back to the first CRYENGINE SDK. Back then, it was more of a hobby, but since CRYENGINE V, I have been actively working with the engine properly. So, I would say roughly 18 years!

How did you get involved with the CRYENGINE community?

At first, I was involved with the older CRYENGINE forums. Since then, I have been helping others with the GameSDK. Once CRYENGINE relaunched the website and launched the official CRYENGINE Discord channel, I joined to keep up with the latest news and help others with issues.

Why did you choose CRYENGINE for this class?

Well, for me, it was no brainer! I have seen a ton of classes being taught for UE4 or Unity, but not for CRYENGINE. So, I took this chance to introduce young kids to another great game engine. And since CRYENGINE V, it is easier to get into CRYENGINE than ever before.

What was the syllabus?

My class syllabus was broken down into animating, programming, sound design, 3D modeling, UI design, and mocap. Every day we spent five hours on each of those subjects, learning with programs like 3D Max, Motion Builder, Photoshop, Flash for UI, Visual Studio for programming, and Substance Painter for texturing our models. It was a lot to take in at first, but I wanted each student to find out which one of those fields they found most interesting.The students started by picking a third person template and then used GameSDK assets to quicken the process of getting objects into the world. Then they created basic things for their game, for instance, weapons, animations for which they did both the key animations and mocap, and programming simple game mechanics like player health. They also designed their own maps, which they had a blast doing!

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How did the students get on with CRYENGINE?

They picked it up really, really fast. It actually surprised me! They were able to understand the engine well. For example, when it came to 3D modeling, they quickly understood the process of importing an asset into the engine and seeing it update in real-time, then making changes to it as needed, and re-importing it. It amazed me how well these students picked it up!

Were you surprised by any of their work?

Oh, man, everything! Some aspects were harder to learn but, regardless, they kept at it, and never gave up. They did great on the programming and map design sections of the class. Most of the time, they would ask a question like, “how do I do this or that?” and once I showed them and taught it, they just built from there and created a lot of interesting stuff.

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Did the students enjoy it?

Yes, they really did. Once the students were finished with the class, we ended up with a prototype game that they played together. They all laughed together at what they had created and how the game worked out. It was perfect.

What features did they find most useful?

The students all got on well with the Designer tool and Character tool. They loved how easy it was to whitebox an area, and with the Character tool, they had fun seeing the animations and learning how to set up the character with attachments, then just jumping right into the game from the sandbox to test it out. They also loved how easy CRYENGINE lighting was for them to set up. For most other engines, I know that’s a hard part, but when the students learned about Global Illumination, they had a blast adjusting and tweaking the settings until it looks just right. Plus, they also enjoyed the Particle system, although they kind of went overboard a little and crashed some of the computers!

What advice would you give to people starting with CRYENGINE? Or people thinking about teaching a course?

My main tip for beginning with CRYENGINE is to start simple. With my students, we began with a simple idea and then learned each thing about the engine to understand how to get the ideas to work. Doing it this way will allow you to do more complex stuff down the road. As for teaching, well, it isn’t easy for sure, but it’s a great way to test your own skills. Sometimes your students come up with questions or problems that you didn’t know about, which in turn help you. It is a great experience for sure, and I had a great time teaching and learning with my students.

Cheers Omar!

If you’re learning CRYENGINE, head to our YouTube channel for a range of tutorials about game design and using our engine. Get all the latest updates about CRYENGINE on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/teaching-game-development-to-kids-with-cryengine Fri, 07 Aug 2020 16:00:36 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Character Animation Pipeline Tutorial: Making a playable character]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/character-animation-pipeline-tutorial-making-a-playable-character

Roman Perezogin, one of our Junior Technical Designers, hosts the next chapter in our Character Animation Pipeline tutorial series. This video builds on the previous tutorials showing you how to reorient animations and explains how to take those animations and apply them to a character, making them playable. In less than ten minutes, you are guided step-by-step through the procedure, from setting up an engine solution, importing animations, changing code in Visual Studio to replace a default character with a new one, setting up Mannequin with new animations, and testing the final result – a playable character. You can find the written version of the tutorial here.

If you are new to the series, you can get up to speed with the following links:

Part 1: Use 3DS Max to reorient animations for use in CRYENGINE

Part 2: Use Maya to reorient animations for use in CRYENGINE

Part 3: Use Blender to reorient animations for use in CRYENGINE

Part 4: Export and Import geometry and animation assets with 3DS Max, Maya, and Blender

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/character-animation-pipeline-tutorial-making-a-playable-character Thu, 06 Aug 2020 16:00:55 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE 5.6.7 hotfix available now]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-5-6-7-hotfix-available-now

Development is in full swing towards our next major release, but, as you know, we are dedicated to providing the most stable current build we can. So, CRYENGINE 5.6.7 is available now from www.CRYENGINE.com and the CRYENGINE Launcher. This release addresses issues that have emerged since the last update, CRYENGINE 5.6.6. Highlights in this hotfix include fixing an error where users could not import generic image formats (JPG, PNG, BMP) by dragging and dropping into the asset browser, ensuring that animation driven motion templates work correctly, and addressing an error in the FBX Importer UI incorrectly stating a sub mesh as LOD rather than Proxy. We also eliminate some unnecessary files from the download package that will help lighten the load.

Please let us know your thoughts and comments on the dedicated forum feedback thread, so we can address new issues in the future as part of our continuing drive to make CRYENGINE the best it can be. Work continues on our roadmap, and if you want to play your part in helping us shape the future of the engine, as well as try out new features first, we encourage you to sign up to the CRYENGINE beta

CRYENGINE 5.6.7 Fixes:

General

  • Tweaked: Removed unnecessary files from the engine build to reduce package size.

Templates

  • Fixed: Templates having an inverted SetAnimationDrivenMotion setting.

Graphics & Rendering

  • Fixed: (RenderDll, CrySystem) Window mode CVars not being respected.

Sandbox

  • Fixed: Setting an object's type from 'LOD0' to 'PhysicsProxy' shows 'LOD6' instead.
  • Fixed: Image conversion failure due to missing third party utility.

You can read the full release notes and the known issues for this hotfix here.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for the latest from CRYENGINE, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have general feedback, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-5-6-7-hotfix-available-now Thu, 30 Jul 2020 15:06:16 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Art Asset Pipeline: PBR Texture Mapping Tutorial Part 2]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-pbr-texture-mapping-tutorial-part-2

Part two of our PBR tutorial mini-series hosted by Alin Alexa, one of our Technical Support Specialists, is out now. The first tutorial in the series introduces you to the terms and concepts used in PBR and texturing workflow, giving you a broad understanding of the topic. The second part of this series provides a practical step-by-step guide that you can follow along with to use photorealistic assets in your projects.

This tutorial gives you an overview of the CryTiff Exporter, provides you with an export workflow for standard PBR Textures, and includes an explanation of Alpha Channels and their use in game development and image workflows. You’ll also be shown how to achieve realistic surface reflection in games, and you’ll be introduced to screen-space reflections and cubemaps. By the end of this series, you will be equipped with an understanding of PBR and workflows to help you create and use amazingly realistic assets in your games.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notifications about all our latest content. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-pbr-texture-mapping-tutorial-part-2 Tue, 28 Jul 2020 16:02:22 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Audio Showcase Tutorial Chapter 4: Dynamic Ambience]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/audio-showcase-tutorial-chapter-4-dynamic-ambience

Check out the latest video in our audio tutorial series hosted by our Learning Manager Brian Dilg, showing you how to create and use dynamic ambience to layer atmospheric audio into your scenes. This tutorial series uses a sample level that you can download for free on CRYENGINE Marketplace and includes everything you need. If you are new to the series, we have provided links to the first three chapters below.

In chapter four of this tutorial, you will be shown how to create audio layers that grow louder as players move closer and fade as they move away.  Brian introduces you to the concepts behind dynamic ambiance, and he then walks you step-by-step through the process, including adding audio trigger controls and layers, using fade parameters, creating area shapes, and more. By the end of the tutorial, you will have a finished level with dynamic audio, which you can test to see your results.

To accompany this tutorial, you can also follow along with our step-by-step written documentation.  The video uses FMOD audio middleware, which you can download from their website. Alongside FMOD, SDL Mixer and Wwise workflows are also covered in the documentation.

This tutorial is the fourth in the series. The following topics are covered:

Part one shows you how to add ambient sounds, audio triggers, and link sounds to actions like firing a gun:

Part two shows you how to add audio to animations:

Part three shows you how to add audio to particles:

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/audio-showcase-tutorial-chapter-4-dynamic-ambience Fri, 24 Jul 2020 16:03:48 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Crysis Remastered Out Now on Nintendo Switch]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crysis-remastered-out-now-on-nintendo-switch

Today Crytek announced the launch of Crysis Remastered on Nintendo Switch! The remaster of the acclaimed first person shooter was developed and optimized in partnership with Saber Interactive. Crysis Remastered is available from July 23rd, 2020 for just 29.99 USD/EUR.

 Players can revisit the classic first person shooter on an all-new platform, or discover the ground-breaking visuals, destructible world, and adaptive gameplay for the very first time as they experience Crysis on the Switch with optimizations like vegetation bending, upgraded textures, depth of field and motion blur, enhanced dynamic lighting, global illumination (SVOGI), and gyro aiming.

 “We are really excited to be bringing Crysis to players on a whole new platform. This will be Crysis’ first time on a Nintendo console, as well as its first time on a handheld, and we think Switch players are going to love it,” said Crytek’s CEO Avni Yerli. “Crysis has always been a special title for us, and this release is a celebration of the passion the Crysis community has continued to bring to the franchise since its release.”

 “The original Crysis was known for hardware-melting graphics, so bringing Crysis to the Switch has been a fun and challenging project,” said Andrey Jones, COO of Saber Interactive. “Our team also brought The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt to Nintendo Switch last year, and that experience in combination with the power of the CRYENGINE are what made the whole thing possible.”

 Get Crysis Remastered on Switch now at the Nintendo eShop. For more information, visit www.crysis.com.

About Crysis

With its 2007 release, Crysis set the industry standard for first person shooters with stunning visuals, highly evolved gameplay, and an enormous sandbox world. What begins as a simple rescue mission becomes the battleground of a new war as alien invaders swarm over the game’s island setting. Armed with a powerful Nanosuit, players must use adaptive tactics to survive and conquer.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/crysis-remastered-out-now-on-nintendo-switch Thu, 23 Jul 2020 12:20:04 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Developer Interview: The future of animation + Roadmap Update]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-developer-interview-the-future-of-animation-roadmap-update

Last week, we released an in-depth tech talk that Claudio Freda, Animation Programmer, and Pawel Wojtasik, Senior Animation Programmer, gave at GIC Poznan 2019. The talk explains the drive to evolve the animation stack, which will future-proof the system, decrease the learning curve, and increase accessibility for designers and technical artists. Today, we’re catching up with the guys to find out more about their progress with the animation system, which features they are most excited about, and how your feedback will help shape the development of the system. We are also updating the roadmap to reflect those new developments, so go take a look after reading the interview!

Hey guys, thanks for joining us. Let’s start with a bit of background. What’s your development history?

Pawel: I’ve been at Crytek for around five years. Before joining Crytek, I was working for another games company, where I first started as a gameplay coder, and then transferred to the engine team. I was part of a small task force developing a new character animation system from scratch, mostly focusing on low-level pieces and performance tuning. Crytek was one of the companies I applied to when I was looking for my next opportunity. The CRYENGINE team and the company environment overall made a great impression on me during my onsite interview. It’s a good experience to work on visible tech which is licensed externally while remaining at a company that is primarily focused on making games.

Claudio: I got into game development when I started my bachelor’s studies in Milan, the usual way, by doing amateur projects with other students. I’ve always been interested in animation, and I started thinking about the intricacies of animation systems when developing a fighting game with my university peers, which unfortunately didn’t end up being finished or released. I worked briefly in Milan as a UE developer but soon moved to Utrecht for a master’s program on game technology and media. I applied to Crytek out of university, after finishing a thesis project on motion synthesis techniques. I hadn‘t worked with CRYENGINE before joining Crytek. I had used Unity initially, and then Unreal Engine primarily, but I found it quite straightforward to switch to CRYENGINE when I joined in 2018. I think having used other engines extensively actually helps me a lot in understanding what’s working well, or not, in CRYENGINE, from an unbiased perspective.

What’s been your most satisfying moment working with CRYENGINE at Crytek?

Pawel: I've honestly had a lot of fun at Crytek, but I think the recent period might be the most satisfying so far. In previous years, a lot of my time was dedicated to supporting in-house and licensee projects, while slowly paying off technical debt in the background. However, we’ve grown our capabilities, team, and secured resources to kick-start development efforts, enabling us to design some new tech from scratch. It feels great to be back on R&D.

Claudio: I don’t have a particular moment, but really any time I get to work with Pawel ends up being very rewarding! We have similar goals and interests but different temperaments, ways of thinking and approaching problems, and it tends to create a constructive and meaningful working relationship. 

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What is the main aim of revamping animation for 2020 and beyond? What limitations are you looking to address?

Pawel: Our most important goal is to improve feature accessibility for non-programmers and to flatten the learning curve for first-timers. Although our current animation system is fairly feature-rich, it can also be hard to grasp and requires programming to access the most advanced features. Even for experienced users, it can eat up time due to slow iteration. From a technical standpoint, I think the main limitation of the current system is a lack of extensibility. CryAnimation offers very few extensibility points, so most of the time, custom features require digging deep into the engine code. With this new initiative, we aim to deliver a robust framework that is efficient, scalable, and future-proofed both for feature extension and hardware advancements.

Claudio: The Mannequin and CryAnimation stack in general is rather advanced, but it’s not the easiest to learn. Its main issue is that it’s implemented as a monolithic module, and you can’t really pick and choose which parts you want or create your own workflows because it was made for a particular approach to animation. It’s also hard for us to extend it with new features. As time goes on, it’s starting to feel a little aged as modern ways of approaching character animation (e.g., motion synthesis) are not possible without significant rework due to some hard assumptions made by CryAnimation about the nature of the animation assets it’s working with. Mannequin tries to solve this by using Fragments and FragmentIDs, but it only works effectively when following the animation model that CRYENGINE was using when it was developed. When deciding if we wanted to improve it or start from scratch, it was an easy choice to go for the second option. We wanted something more modular and flexible that allowed us and Crytek’s game teams to try out different approaches, depending on the game we’re developing. We also wanted to replicate the most useful Mannequin features in a more accessible way, so that users, internal or external, who are learning the system can learn one feature at a time as they need it. The final goal is that through the Playables system, both our teams and our users will be able to expand the new animation system with their own features while working organically with the provided modules, instead of having to work in parallel or override the results of the animation system.

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How will the new animation system compare to other engines?

Pawel: To be honest, we've been behind on certain industry trends when it comes to animation tools, so there’s an element of catching up that we’ve needed to do. Despite that, we still believe our design approach has certain advantages over what's out currently out there in the market, especially when it comes to complexity management, offloading performance concerns, and extensibility. Of course, this still needs to be proven in practice.

Claudio:  The features that we’re developing are not necessarily groundbreaking if considered individually. Timelines are present as Montages in UE and as Timelines in Unity. State Machines are pretty much everywhere. However, other features of the new system that is unique to CRYENGINE (tags, transitions, motion maps) we are lifting from Mannequin and offering them as individual modules. The main innovation is the way that all these features come together cohesively, and interact together as Playable assets that are consumed by Animation graphs. There’s also a big difference between our Animation Graphs and similar blend graphs or animation graphs that are offered in other engines: our focus on purely functional computation. This allows us to take advantage of a number of properties that are better explained in detail in the talk. We are also constraining users to keep stateful computation and state machines outside of the Animation Graph, which is largely for the better – if you’ve ever seen a UE4 Animation Graph with a deeply nested stack of state machines and evaluation graphs, you know what I’m talking about.

You revealed a lot of information about your plans in the tech talk. How has progress gone so far, since then?

Pawel: Unfortunately, we experienced some setbacks due to other projects taking priority and the recent pandemic outbreak. Although we haven't progressed at the pace we originally planned, we're currently back on track, and we are excited to gather feedback from our internal game teams on the feature prototypes we're finally wrapping up. Design-wise, the overall approach has been validated, although some details obviously changed as we started implementing them – that’s just the reality of software development. In many cases, we managed to come up with more simple and more efficient solutions by exploiting properties we hadn’t considered before.

Claudio: We are mostly working on internal versions of these features. Progress has been slow but steady. The thing that I’m most satisfied with is that throughout development, the initial design changed very little from how we initially envisioned it, which validates our ideas and assumptions about actual animation use-cases. The main difference between now and the talk is that Transitions have moved to a separate system that works in parallel with Scopes, instead of being part of the Motion Map/State Machine complex. You can look forward to more updates about this in the future.

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Which features are you most excited about users getting their hands on when they are released?

Pawel: Personally, I'm most excited about users playing around with the animation graph, maybe even coming up with fully procedural character setups driven through pose modifiers. Although we'll be shipping a very limited feature set for the preview, and it's hard to imagine complete setups working before we have the whole package ready, early feedback is still very important to us.

Claudio: I think users are going to really like to play around with the Animation Graph and experiment with their own animation setups.

Are you planning on any Phoneme or Lip-Sync tooling?

Pawel: We have a phoneme tool in the engine (Face Editor), and there are currently no plans to improve it. However, this feature is still on our radar, has already been discussed multiple times. We might have to tackle it mid-to-long term, depending on our in-house project requirements. In that case, we’ll either develop a solution ourselves or integrate some middleware, and our roadmap will be updated accordingly.

Is there going to be animation retargeting/reorientation in Sandbox?

Claudio: Regarding static retargeting, also known as offline retargeting, it’s something we’re thinking about in the future, but it’s not something we’re currently working on. This would be mostly a quality-of-life feature, as retargeting features in DCC tools are very extensive and complete.  Runtime, or online, retargeting is a different issue. We have no plans currently to develop this feature in the short term, but the new Playables system is designed for easy development of features like this as plugins. This is on a list of features we are considering developing in the future after the modular animation system is mature.

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Are there any plans for Live MoCap capturing tooling?

Claudio: Again, the new Playables system is designed for easy development of features like this as plugins. This is on a list of features we are considering developing in the future after the modular animation system becomes established.

Will animations and/or characters from previous versions be compatible with the new system?

Claudio: The base animation clip and blendspace format remains unchanged. The new system will exist in parallel with the legacy system until we can offer complete feature parity. Characters will be able to use the new system, or the legacy one, on a character-by-character basis. There might also be a limited third hybrid mode, where the pose results of the old system can be modified through animation graphs.

Do you have any tips for people working with animation in CRYENGINE generally?

Pawel: If you're stuck working on that feature you were supposed to ship yesterday, just abuse pose modifiers.

Claudio: Keep learning Mannequin, even if the new system is going to come out. The concepts behind Mannequin are still absolutely valid, and you will be able to carry your knowledge over the new system.

Cheers guys!

Head over to our YouTube channel for the tech talk, tutorials, and more insights about game development. We look forward to your feedback on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-developer-interview-the-future-of-animation-roadmap-update Tue, 21 Jul 2020 16:01:02 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Developer Insights: Building an animation system for 2020 and beyond]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/developer-insights-building-an-animation-system-for-2020-and-beyond

Development on CRYENGINE never stops, and today you can get an insight into the future of our engine’s animation system in a tech talk first given at GIC Poznan 2019 - now revealed from the vault for everyone's public view. In the talk, Claudio Freda, Junior Animation Programmer, and Pawel Wojtasik, Senior Animation Programmer, introduce the new animation system for CRYENGINE and explain how they are bringing innovations to the game animation landscape. The talk covers both low-level animation computational code and animation controllers, which are high-level systems, used to control animations on characters. The session also gives an overview of the pros and cons of the current Mannequin system, and you’ll learn about our plans to evolve the animation stack, which will future-proof the system, decrease the learning curve, and increase accessibility for designers and technical artists.

Next week we will be providing a new roadmap update and giving more information about the upcoming changes to the animation system, and an update on progress so far, with a further interview with Claudio and Pawel. Stay tuned to our usual channels for that, but in the meantime, check out this fascinating talk below.

Revealing this talk is the first step in a series of spotlights highlighting our development process on the engine. We want to start with more developer insights on what's next for CRYENGINE by taking a closer look at the Animation System overhaul, so stay tuned for more updates from Pawel and Claudio!

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notifications about all our latest content. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/developer-insights-building-an-animation-system-for-2020-and-beyond Fri, 17 Jul 2020 18:36:40 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Master environments in CRYENGINE]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/master-environments-in-cryengine-1

The latest installment in our expansive, in-depth environment editor series, which shows you how to create beautiful worlds with CRYENGINE, is out today. We have also released two new asset packs on the CRYENGINE Marketplace to accompany the course. Hosted by our Learning Manager, Brian Dilg, chapter four in the series covers two categories of post-production effects, HDR and filters. The video goes into detail about the tools and settings you can use to create believable, consistent worlds. Brian also provides you with the underlying theory behinds the techniques demonstrated, giving you a rounded understanding that will help you in your projects.

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The latest in-depth tutorial covers everything from understanding dynamic exposure on human visual perception and the link between auto exposure and field of view, to how to simulate human lowlight vision, use color to create realistic night scenes, and how to use and balance realism and creativity to create the right atmosphere for your scenes. You can also follow along with the tutorial by using our comprehensive written documentation.

If you are new to the series, we recommend you start at the beginning! The series begins with an overview of the environment editor and then shows you how to master volumetric fog and use SVOGI and ambient lighting. Each tutorial is accompanied by written documentation. Check out all of the lessons released so far in our recap blog.

To accompany the release of part four in this series, we have also released two free assets packs on the CRYENGINE Marketplace, which can be used across all of the tutorials.

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The Environment Presets Pack

Thirteen environment presets covering a range of environment and time of day styles, from dawn to dusk. Scenes include:

  • A simple, clear night with a low moon in the sky
  • A full 24-hour day/night cycle
  • A sun low and warm in the sky with heavy volumetric clouds
  • A simulated infrared camera view with a green tint, heavy grain and bloom, and limited depth of field
  • Volumetric clouds placed low to mimic fog volumes, strongly affected by wind
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The Terrain Example Pack

This pack includes three diverse scenes to use in conjunction with the tutorials:

  • Huge craters in a desolate, rough landscape
  • An island of steep mountains and a rugged valley
  • Dramatic mountains and deep valleys with a river and roads carved through them

To get the most out of these tutorials, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/master-environments-in-cryengine-1 Thu, 16 Jul 2020 16:09:29 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Art Asset Pipeline: PBR Texture Mapping Tutorial]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-pbr-texture-mapping-tutorial

Physically based rendering (PBR) is the topic for our latest tutorial mini-series hosted by Alin Alexa, one of our Technical Support Specialists. The series will cover the PBR texturing workflow in CRYENGINE and explain industry standards so that you can achieve photorealism in your scenes. The first video in the series introduces the terms and concepts used in PBR and texturing workflows. You will receive an overview of PBR, an explanation of standard texture map types, and a review of material functions and parameters. The tutorial will arm you with a broad understanding of the topic in advance of the release of the second part in this mini-series, which provides a practical step-by-step guide that you can follow.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for the release of part two, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notifications about all our latest content. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-pbr-texture-mapping-tutorial Fri, 10 Jul 2020 17:18:49 +0200 Crytek