CRYENGINE | The complete solution for next generation game development by Crytek https://www.cryengine.com/ The most powerful game development platform for you and your team to create world-class entertainment experiences. en-US Copyright 2020, Crytek GmbH. Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:08:13 +0100 Tue, 31 Mar 2020 01:56:30 +0200 60 <![CDATA[Never stop Achieving - CRYENGINE Showcase 2020: Games of the Decade]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/never-stop-achieving-cryengine-showcase-2020-games-of-the-decade

Our CRYENGINE 2020 Showcase video demonstrates how the engine has evolved over the years, celebrates landmark releases from indie and AAA developers, and features teams using our engine’s power to make some of the most interesting, engaging, and beautiful contemporary games. We’re proud to work with and support developers in teams of all sizes who use our game development platform to create amazing experiences, and also that so many teams don’t just choose CRYENGINE once, but continue with it on their game development journey too.  Check out the video which features ten years of games created with CRYENGINE, and if something you’ve worked on isn’t here yet, maybe it will be in next year’s showcase… 

Starring in the CRYENGINE Showcase 2020:

AdroV Games:

2016 – Investigator

2018 – ShadowSide

2020 – ColdSide

Arkane Studios:

2017 – Prey

Baseline Games:

2017 – Deceit

Campfire Games:

2020 - War of Rights

CI Games:

2013 – Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2

2017 – Sniper: Ghost Warrior 3

2019 – Sniper: Ghost Warrior Contracts

Crytek:

2011 – Crysis 2

2013 – Crysis 3

2013 – Ryse: Son of Rome

2013 – Warface

2016 – The Climb (VR)

2016 – Robinson: The Journey (VR)

2019 – HUNT: Showdown

Deep Silver Dambuster Studios:

2016 – Homefront: The Revolution

Bil Deerbuch:

2020 – Ramiwo

Entrada Interactive:

2020 – Miscreated

Frog Factory:

2018 – Heathen – The Sons of the Law

Alessandro Guzzo:

2017 – The Land of Pain

2020 – The Alien Cube

Investigate North:

2017 – Aporia: Beyond the Valley

Mystik Art:

2020 - Racing Glider

Pathfinder Games:

2018 – Vanguard Normandy – 1944

tinyBuild Games:

2019 – Pandemic Express

Turtle Rock Studios:

2015 – Evolve

War Horse Studios:

2018 – Kingdom Come: Deliverance

Wolcen Studios:

2020 - Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem

We’d like to thank everyone whose work appears in this showcase and all the developers who use CRYENGINE to make unique, diverse, and brilliant entertainment.

Are you making something great with CRYENGINE? Let us know in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.  Don’t forget to join the community and our CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.

Want to work on CRYENGINE? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/never-stop-achieving-cryengine-showcase-2020-games-of-the-decade Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:08:13 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Android Beta Program]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-android-beta-program

Crytek is pleased to announce that developers everywhere are invited to experience the power of CRYENGINE on mobile first by registering for a beta program at cryengine.com/beta. The beta program will launch later this year. CRYENGINE is the cutting-edge 3D game development platform famed for its industry-leading renderer, real-time lighting, and optimized VR support, and Crytek has partnered with Google to bring the engine to the Android ecosystem.

The technology behind CRYENGINE is platform-agnostic by design. Starting with the Android pipeline, the mobile beta program is the first step in bringing the engine that powers some of the most ambitious and beautiful games on console and PC to more mobile platforms, following the Oculus Quest launch of Crytek’s award-winning free solo rock climbing game, The Climb.

Theodor Mader, Technical Director for CRYENGINE, said: “The CRYENGINE team is dedicated to helping game makers achieve their vision by putting the most powerful tools in the industry at their fingertips. We’re proud that teams of all sizes, all around the world, choose our game development platform, and by participating in the beta program, developers will get to experience what CRYENGINE can achieve on mobile chipsets, as well as participate in the development of the new Android pipeline.”

CRYENGINE gives developers full control over their multi-platform creations in real-time. The engine’s WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) suite of tools enables real-time creation, editing, and an in-game preview of every aspect and feature of a game, empowering developers to focus on delivering great experiences thanks to a fast iterative process. In addition to the beta program’s role in bringing the engine to new platforms, CRYENGINE’s learning offering continues to evolve and expand, making it even easier for people new to game development, or experienced game makers transitioning from different engines, to learn how to use CRYENGINE to create great games quickly.

Developers everywhere can harness the power of CRYENGINE today, and register their interest in the mobile beta program, by visiting www.cryengine.com/beta.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-android-beta-program Mon, 23 Mar 2020 17:19:25 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Racing Glider]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/racing-glider

Racing Glider reinvents the futuristic racing game classics by delivering rally-inspired tracks set in beautiful environments. The game has received its full release after a successful early access period and it is the second game from Merhunes following the platformer Rolling Sun. Racing Glider is yet another brilliant example of what a solo developer can achieve with our engine, and we spoke to Merhunes to find out more about the game, the development experience, and discover tips for other one-man-band outfits.

Thanks for joining us and congratulations on the release of Racing Glider! What can players expect in Racing Glider now it has launched?

Now that Racing Glider has launched, it includes 52 circuits on which the player will be able to race on to obtain medals. Medals are essential to progress in the game and unlock new circuits. There are two very different types of vehicles in Racing Glider and each has its own gameplay and, therefore, different circuits. The heart of the game is the mastery of inertia, driving, and vehicle physics.

My favorite aspect of the game is the mix between the rally and the Wipeout style of gameplay. I really like the idea of racing at full speed across different terrain and paths. I think it’s what sets Racing Glider apart from other games in the racing genre.

What are the main improvements you have made from early access to launch?

The most important improvement is the addition of the second vehicle, the Mantis Glider. It is a vehicle capable of racing across many different types of terrain. Also, 15 circuits were added to the game. As well as a number of options, I also added the ultimate challenge with a diamond medal on offer, and the menu has been revised. And of course, there was a lot of work done on optimization, stability, physics, and the simulation of the vehicles.

Racing Glider is your second solo game, and you’ve been involved in the community for a long time. What’s your history with CRYENGINE and Crytek?

My story with CRYENGINE started over ten years ago with Sandbox 2 from the game Crysis. I began by making simple maps, some of which were popular like Hunter's Life. This is what made me want to go further. I worked on several game projects and mods like Recon Arcade, Crash Bandicoot Returns, and Butterfly that you may have seen on the CRYENGINE forums a long time ago. Then I started to understand that the engine combined with the skills I had acquired meant that I could create a game on my own. So I developed Rolling Sun, and I would say that this is where things really started to happen. Crytek noticed me and my work, and they really helped me.

Some people at Crytek gave their time to help me and advised me about the release of Rolling Sun. I think in particular of Erla, but, obviously, many others too. Even some members of the voluntary community like Lavizh have supported me a lot. I always appreciate the help and the welcome that I received from the Crytek team, whether for technical aspects or for advice. It's great to feel that a company is looking at your work and supporting you as a solo developer.

How did the community help you during the development of Racing Glider?

The community really played a role in development. I received a lot of constructive advice, and it allowed me to change things and even discover issues that I had not seen from the same perspective as a player. The community reacted rather well to the launch, and I am happy and encouraged. I have received some touching comments from people who have been following Racing Glider since the start of early access. When you work alone, it really gives you a boost.

What were the main CRYENGINE features that made a difference for you?

There were many! I would say in this case that CRYENGINE’s vehicle editor and physics were essential to the development of Racing Glider. The vehicle editor is straightforward to use and allows you to modify the parameters and reactions of a vehicle in great detail. I am also obliged to cite Flowgraph, as well as the Time of Day system. Flowgraph is great for simplified programming, and the Time of Day system makes lighting and rendering a real pleasure.

What tips would you give to solo developers?

I think if there is one essential thing to do when you want to embark upon a solo development, it's to think again and again about game design on paper before you get into the project. It is necessary to reduce your game concept to the essential principles of game design. Define the basic foundation of the gameplay, such as "breaking things," "avoiding things,” "jumping," and so on. It is important to make your game fun to play with just the basics of the gameplay. That means you can add things on top of a solid base. If your game needs a lot of elements to become fun, it means that its foundation may need improving. I think it's about keeping the power of your imagination and dreams while balancing it with the realities of production.

Now Racing Glider has launched, what do you plan to move on to next?

This is the big question I ask myself! I have several possibilities. I like the idea of getting into a new game. I think that is really what I would like to do because I already have a few ideas in mind.

However, continuing to improve Racing Glider further also appeals to me. I think it will depend a lot on the success of the game and the support of the community. Either way, I hope to be able to present new exciting things later this year!

Cheers, Merhunes!

You can check out Racing Glider’s unique fusion of Wipeout-style gameplay on rally-inspired tracks by buying the game on Steam right now.

Are you making something unique with CRYENGINE? Let us know in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.  Don’t forget to join the community and our CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. 

Want to work on CRYENGINE? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/racing-glider Wed, 18 Mar 2020 16:01:20 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[A message to the CRYENGINE community in the wake of COVID-19]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/a-message-to-the-cryengine-community-in-the-wake-of-covid-19

Today we want to inform you about our response in regards to the situation surrounding COVID-19.

As a studio, we prioritize the health and safety of our team. As such, the entire studio will be working remotely to ensure that we do our part to stop the spread of the virus and reduce the risk to the health of our team.

Our goal is to continue the development of CRYENGINE without interruption or delay and to ensure everyone using CRYENGINE receives continued service and support.

As always, we appreciate your support. And remember to wash your hands, and look after yourselves, each other, and vulnerable members of your community.

Our services will continue, so stay tuned for new updates about the engine on Facebook and Twitter, and join the community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. Our forum is also a great place to hang out. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

And, of course, we’re still looking for new colleagues. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/a-message-to-the-cryengine-community-in-the-wake-of-covid-19 Wed, 18 Mar 2020 14:36:09 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Environment Editor Tutorial Part Two]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/environment-editor-tutorial-part-two

In part two of our tutorial series covering the environment editor, Learning Manager Brian Dilg walks you through the use of volumetric fog, from its theoretical underpinnings and relationship to real-world atmosphere to fine-tuning voxelization through console variables. Brian also compares the previous fog effect with the advantages that volumetric fog provides, showing you the parallels as well as the differences. The tutorial goes on to explain the environment editor parameters, distinguishing between those that affect global fog from those that only affect local fog volumes.

In the tutorial, which lasts just under 25 minutes, you’ll learn every detail about how to configure fog to look just the way you need it to, including explaining the concepts of albedo vs. emissive color, and mastering fine control over scattering, density, range, and clamping. Finally, you will be shown how to use local volumetric fog volumes to simulate global and localized areas of fog or planetary atmosphere, and Brian recommends some best practices used in production by our own environment artists.

You can also access our written documentation, which covers the topics discussed in even more depth.

If you haven’t watched it already, you can find the first part of this tutorial series here, in which Brian gives you an overview of the editor’s features, showing how to use lighting to deliver atmosphere and ambiance in your levels, whether you wish to achieve a realistic or a more stylized aesthetic.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/environment-editor-tutorial-part-two Thu, 12 Mar 2020 10:31:31 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Miscreated: Canyonlands DLC]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/miscreated-canyonlands-dlc

Miscreated is a beautiful multiplayer hardcore survival game set in a post-apocalyptic future, where you must fight to survive against mutants, other players, and even against Mother Nature herself. The CRYENGINE-powered open-world game recently released its Canyonlands DLC, which expands the game with a new environment based on a fictional Navajo-style desert. Up to 50 players play on a server, fighting unpredictable weather, hostile animals, mutant hordes, and each other with new weapons, gear, and vehicles. We spoke to Terry Evans, CEO of developer Entrada Interactive, to find out more.

Hey Terry, thanks for joining us. It's been over a year since the launch of Miscreated. How has the game evolved?

Miscreated continues to be actively developed since leaving early access. There have been several updates released since that time, as well as our new Canyonlands DLC. The updates have added many new events, weapons, clothes, base-building variations, bug fixes, features, and just general refinements to the game.

What can players expect in the new DLC, Canyonlands?

The Canyonlands map is very different from our Islands map. The Islands map is all lush and green with an enormous amount of vegetation and larger cities, but the Canyonlands map is desert-themed with sparse, desert-style vegetation and just a few smaller settlements. It is also a smaller map, which increases the likelihood and frequency of encountering other players. The new map also introduces some unique clothing, weapons, AI, and structures that are more suitable for the desert and don't spawn on the default Islands map.

What was your inspiration for taking players into the desert?

Canyonlands was the original title for Miscreated when it was initially being developed, and the map at that time was based on the Canyonlands national park. So, it's a homage to the origins of the game. We also wanted a new experience for the players to enjoy - something drastically different from the Islands map.

How has CRYENGINE helped you deliver this new DLC?

The Canyonlands DLC is built on top of the modding support in CRYENGINE, with some additional custom modifications that we implemented. It is essentially one big mod.

What are you and the team most proud of when you look back over the development of Miscreated?

We are very proud of the community that has formed around the game - some truly wonderful and amazing fans. There are people we have never met in person, but that have been around our community for many years providing us with valuable feedback and input on the game. Some of those people even ended up helping us as community moderators and official testers of the game, for which we are very grateful. As a development team, we have also formed internal friendships that I hope last for a lifetime. They are an amazing, dedicated bunch of individuals who have been working together for several years. Thank you to all the fans and team members of the game!

How has the community helped shaped the development of the game?

Throughout the early access process, and since our release from it, we've had a very active player community that is always providing us with useful feedback. We've done our best to listen to their feedback and, if that feedback is aligned with our game development vision, then we've implemented, or altered, features based on the player's input. With the addition of modding support, our community has also added a lot of content that they desired to be in the game, which has helped add diversity to a lot of player-run servers.

What's the future for Miscreated?

In the near-term, we will be expanding some of the areas of the Canyonlands map, some of it based on player feedback, so there will be more areas to explore. At the current time, there are no further plans for an additional DLC, but we would like to release a smaller map that would be more PvP based for players that would rather play PvP than focus on the survival aspects of the game.

Cheers, Terry! 

Discover more about Miscreated by visiting https://www.miscreatedgame.com/ and pick up the original game and the new DLC on Steam.

If you’re making something cool with CRYENGINE, let us know on the forum or via Facebook and Twitter. Don’t forget that you can join the community and our CRYENGINE development team over on our official Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/miscreated-canyonlands-dlc Mon, 09 Mar 2020 16:08:12 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Art Asset Pipeline Tutorial: Collision Proxies Part 3]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-tutorial-collision-proxies-part-3

In this latest part of our Master Class tutorial series for Collision Proxies, Alin Alexa, one of our Technical Support Specialist, shows you the recommended way to setup and import Collision Proxies using the FBX pipeline in CRYENGINE using Blender. In this tutorial we explain a brief overview of the Collision Proxies used and give some detail surrounding the material and object hierarchy in Blender itself necessary to successfully import the these assets into the engine using the FBX Importer. 

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A collision proxy is a geometric model that is used for calculations in the physics module of CRYENGINE. This includes physical collisions, friction, and physical raycasts to name just a few. They also provide the opportunity to simplify the physical model compared to the rendered mesh to optimize for performance. By the end of the tutorial, you will be able to use Blender or other 3d modeling tools that support FBX to create physical collision proxies for your models, which you can import into CRYENGINE using your favored workflow. 

Further information about setting up assets and exporting them from Blender into CRYENGINE can be found in our written documentation. If you want to learn how to create physical collision proxies using a 3DS Max workflow, check out the first tutorial in this series or perhaps if you prefer to use Autodesk Maya then check out the previous tutorial in this series.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-tutorial-collision-proxies-part-3 Fri, 06 Mar 2020 16:02:36 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Meet the Team: Alin Alexa, Technical Support Engineer]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-alin-alexa-technical-support-engineer

You may recognize Alin as one of our tutorial hosts. In today’s interview, we learn about his journey from being a community member to joining our team and how that experience helps him in his role as a Technical Support Engineer.

Hey, Alin! So, how did you get into CRYENGINE?

I come from a small town named Lugoj, in the depths of western Romania. I became interested in working with games by playing with various modding tools and seeing how fun and instant the feedback is when you put your imagination into pixels. But I wanted more! I wanted to experiment with making my own little worlds and seeing how I could create a game from scratch. So, I started looking into game engines, came across CRYENGINE, and I have used it for over eight years now! 

Excluding my whole graveyard of abandoned projects, I was initially focused on a story-driven game called Desecrated. Sadly, it never got to see the light of day. However, I would say the experience of developing it was more about the journey than the destination. I wanted to gain as much experience as I possibly could to better myself in the arts and crafts of level design, 3D modeling, programming, and audio design.

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How did you join Crytek?

I arrived at Crytek thanks to my buddy Roman Perezogin, who I knew for a couple of years before joining. We were both active in the CRYENGINE community, and we both had our ambitions and plans in regards to our careers. He was the first to join Crytek and invited me to work alongside him after only a few months. I gladly took that opportunity!

What's it like moving from being part of our community to working at CRYENGINE for our community?

I probably wouldn't be here if it hadn’t been for my decision to choose CRYENGINE as my go-to engine. It helped me see both the positives and negatives of working as a solo indie game developer. It was easy when it needed to be easy, and it was hard when I needed the motivation to investigate some of the more challenging concepts to grasp in the industry. But in a way, I don't feel that different compared to how I felt before I joined Crytek. I get the chance to work on the engine directly, which is great. But I still feel the same way towards CRYENGINE and its community! Whenever I help someone achieve a particular task, I'm just glad that I get to be the person that I was looking for in the community a few years back when I was learning about the Sandbox Editor.

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What has been your most satisfying moment working with CRYENGINE at Crytek?

I think that being able to see some of the internally developed games running directly in the Sandbox Editor is a really powerful motivation. It shows you what you can achieve with CRYENGINE when you have the right mindset and dedication. It’s inspiring!

What does a regular day at work look like for you?

Well, I come in, and I grab a coffee along with some workmates. Then I carry on with daily tasks such as 3D modeling, lighting, recording voiceovers, editing, and other creative undertakings.

What is your main focus at the moment?

Learning. I want to master everything there is to know about the subjects I mentioned earlier. I love helping people and being the one who knows the answers to most of the questions, so I guess my main focus is to learn as much as possible and put it into practice when the time is right.

What does it take to do your job well?

I’d say a little bit of everything. Even the tiniest skill set can come in handy, often when you expect it the least. Also, I think patience is probably the key element in achieving the result you're hoping for. Rome wasn't built in a day, and your projects won't ever be completed as quickly as you estimate. As long as you keep that in mind and don't set any false expectations of yourself and your work, you'll do pretty well!

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Have you got any tips for anyone aspiring to work in your field?

I'm not going to go for the typical "never give up" kind of inspiration. I think that's common sense at this point. Just work on yourself and try to step outside of your comfort zone as often as you can to learn new skills that can contribute to your career.

Which feature are you looking forward to seeing come to the engine most?

Ray tracing has got to be one of the coolest features. I'm massively looking forward to seeing what people will create with this new technology when it comes to CRYENGINE. It's a real game-changer, no pun intended!

Are you still developing games in your spare time?

Right now, I've taken a break from my game development projects for a while. I'm definitely going to return to them at some point, but I have different skill sets that I'm currently working on improving.

What are you playing at the moment?

Lately, I've mostly been into VR games such as Pavlov VR and Boneworks, as well as non-VR games such as Path of Exile, which I really enjoy. Despite its many flaws, I think that Gothic 3 has a special place in my heart for its atmosphere, vast world, and incredible soundtrack. I think that game aged really well and is still playable to this day.

Cheers, Alin!

Join Alin over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. The CRYENGINE team is always collating your feedback on our channels, so if you have suggestions about the engine or future tutorials, do let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Would you like to follow Alin’s journey from the community to working on our team? We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-alin-alexa-technical-support-engineer Tue, 03 Mar 2020 16:00:43 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Environment Editor Tutorial]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/environment-editor-tutorial

Learning Manager Brian Dilg introduces you to the CRYENGINE environment editor in part one of our new tutorial series. The video gives you an overview of the tool, the principles upon which it was designed, and the three key parameters which most dramatically affect the appearance of your game world: the sun, the sky, and fog. The concepts and benefits of a dynamic versus a static time of day are discussed in the video, and you will be shown how to create and assign environment presets. 

In just under 30 minutes, this practical tutorial provides a tour of the editor’s features as you learn how to use lighting to deliver atmosphere and ambiance in your levels, whether you wish to achieve a realistic or a more stylized aesthetic. The tutorial takes you step-by-step through generating terrain in a new level to controlling environmental lighting during the day or night. You can also access our written documentation, which covers the topics discussed in even more depth. 

Future chapters in this series will cover the use of volumetric fog and clouds, real-time global illumination (SVOGI), fine control over light scattering, color grading, and using HDR to create realistic presets for various times of day, as well showing you how to create looks unlike those seen on planet Earth.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel. 

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. 

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/environment-editor-tutorial Fri, 28 Feb 2020 16:01:21 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Razer Chroma RGB Integration reveal]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-razer-chroma-rgb-integration-reveal

Our Neon Noir ray tracing benchmark, which gives you a score based on how well your rig can run CRYENGINE’s future ray tracing technology, proudly supports Razer Chroma-enabled devices to enhance your experience. Today, we have released a video in which members of our CRYENGINE team reveal more about the cooperation between Razer and CRYENGINE to integrate Chroma support into Neon Noir. The video shows a demonstration of Razer Chroma-enabled hardware devices lighting up as the Neon Noir benchmark plays out, enhancing the atmosphere and ambiance of the experience. The video also reveals how the implementation of the effects in the engine took under a day. Developers everywhere will be able to enhance their games by implementing Razer Chroma effects when a native integration comes to a future release of CRYENGINE. Watch our developer diary below:

You can download the Neon Noir ray tracing benchmark for free from the CRYENGINE Marketplace and find out more about how we created the technology that powers Neon Noir in our in-depth blog. Learn more about Razer Chroma-enabled devices by visiting https://developer.razer.com/chroma/.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel to get all the latest videos from CRYENGINE. We look forward to your feedback in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity. We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-razer-chroma-rgb-integration-reveal Wed, 26 Feb 2020 15:56:09 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Art Asset Pipeline: Collision Proxies Part 2]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-collision-proxies-part-2

In the second part of our latest Master Class tutorial series, Alin Alexa, one of our Technical Support Specialists, takes you step-by-step through a proven-in-production art asset pipeline using Autodesk Maya. This video demonstrates how to set up the CryMaya tools and how to create physical collision proxies in Autodesk Maya using a CryTools pipeline, in addition to an FBX pipeline. The tutorial also includes a basic explanation of Maya’s material and shader functionality, with regards to Maya’s Hypershade function, in comparison to CRYENGINE’s material system.

A collision proxy is a geometric model that is used for calculations in the physics module of CRYENGINE. This includes physical collisions, friction, and physical raycasts to name just a few. They also provide the opportunity to simplify the physical model compared to the rendered mesh to optimize for performance. By the end of the tutorial, you will be able to Use Autodesk Maya to create physical collision proxies, which you can import into CRYENGINE using your favored workflow.

Further information about setting up assets and exporting them from Maya into CRYENGINE can be found in our written documentation. If you want to learn how to create physical collision proxies using a 3DS Max workflow, check out the first tutorial in this series.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-collision-proxies-part-2 Fri, 21 Feb 2020 16:00:26 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Puzzle game Ramiwo releases today]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/puzzle-game-ramiwo-releases-today

Ramiwo is a stylish indie game created by a small team that you can play on Steam today. The game was created as a side project, and we spoke to Tom Deerberg, Environment Artist at Crytek, about what players can expect and how the team used CRYENGINE to create their indie game quickly.

Hey Tom, thanks for joining us. What was the inspiration behind this project?

The idea was born after some speed modeling exercises. One evening, I modeled a scenario from one photo, similar to these. It was all very rough and dirty, but it captured a mood quite nicely. After doing around 25 of them, I got bored and started to remix the sets, mixing a city with a barn, a jungle with a harbor, industrial sites with a forest landscape, and much more. After another 25 remixed settings, I decided to try some more extreme things, like using vertex deformation and texture oscillators. I was trying out things we don’t normally do very much during regular production at Crytek.

It was around this time that the idea came about to make more than just another Artstation post. How could we make something for players? I asked a colleague to help me prototype a version of an endless cube, with environments connected through gates with four per environment, represented on a cube that serves as a map.

What will players experience when they play Ramiwo?

The player will see a lot of different environments in a very fast rhythm, with environments ranging from the realistic to the surreal. The player must study the map to understand where they are, and then read the environment to work out how to get to the next new area. Players may get a little lost at times, but that’s part of the puzzle!

You’ve worked on several of our AAA productions. What was the biggest difference in development when it came to creating Ramiwo?

The biggest difference was to think small! It’s not about applying all of the learned knowledge from a regular AAA production, but working with what is available. I wanted to choose a short time frame, scope, and keep the game assets simple.

Which CRYENGINE features helped you with this project?

We used the engine’s basic tools because we wanted to keep the scope small. The environment editor helped us create a wide range of different lighting, and the cube map baker helped us quickly create ‘cheap’ reflections and ambient light. We used Flowgraph to build the logic for teleporting from world-to-world and used a visual script to build a simple first person setup. The compile function allowed us to package the final build.

What advice would you give to developers who want to create a short game like this?

Stay small in scope, rethink ideas, and cut as many ideas as possible if you are working alone or as part of a very small team. We had many more ideas, but we decided to keep everything small and simple. But most of all, just give it a try if you are interested as it’s a really exciting process.

Cheers, Tom!

Check out Ramiwo on Steam now. If you do decide to try it, be sure to let them know how you liked the game.

Are you working on an indie game? Let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/puzzle-game-ramiwo-releases-today Wed, 19 Feb 2020 16:00:58 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Hunt: Showdown out now on PlayStation® 4 and Microsoft Xbox®]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-showdown-out-now-on-playstation-r-4-and-microsoft-xbox-r

Crytek and Koch Media happily announce that the highly acclaimed online multi-player bounty hunting game Hunt: Showdown is now available physically and digitally for PlayStation®4 and physically for Microsoft Xbox®.

About Hunt: Showdown

Hunt: Showdown is a competitive first-person bounty hunting game that packs the thrill of survival games into a match-based format. Set in Louisiana in 1895, the game boasts a mixture of PvP and PvE elements that creates a uniquely tense experience. It’s not just the creatures who are a threat—it’s every Hunter on the map. In the classic game mode, a match of Hunt pits ten players—playing solo or in teams of two—against each other as they race to take out gruesome beasts for a bounty they must collect and get off of the map, while Hunt’s quickplay mode offers a shorter match for solo players to scavenge for weapons as they compete for a diminishing pool of bounty. The higher the risk, the higher the reward–but a single mistake could cost everything.

About Koch Media

Koch Media is a leading producer and distributor of digital entertainment products (games, films and software). The company's own publishing activities, marketing and distribution extend throughout Europe, North America and Australia. The Koch Media group has more than 25 years of experience in the digital media business, and has risen to become the number one publishing partner in Europe. It has also formed strategic alliances with numerous games and software publishers: Bethesda, Capcom, Codemasters, Kaspersky Labs, Konami, Koei Tecmo, Milestone, Sega, Square Enix, etc. in various European countries. With Headquarter in Höfen, Austria Koch Media owns branches in Germany, England, France, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, the Nordic regions, Benelux, Australia, Czech Republic, Poland, and the United States.

All product titles, publisher names, trademarks, artwork and associated imagery are trademarks, registered trademarks and/or copyright material of the respective owners. All rights reserved.

About Crytek

Crytek is an independent videogame developer, publisher, and technology provider dedicated to pushing the boundaries of gaming with its cutting-edge 3D game development solution CRYENGINE. With headquarters in Frankfurt am Main (Germany) and studios in Kiev (Ukraine), and Istanbul (Turkey), Crytek has created multiple award-winning titles, including the original Far Cry, the Crysis series, Ryse: Son of Rome, Warface, The Climb, Robinson: The Journey and Hunt: Showdown. Crytek delivers fun and innovative gaming experiences for PC, consoles, and VR and continues to grow its reach in the games-as-a-service market. Every Crytek game is created with CRYENGINE, which can be used by anyone to create games.

For more information visit www.crytek.com and www.cryengine.com.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-showdown-out-now-on-playstation-r-4-and-microsoft-xbox-r Tue, 18 Feb 2020 12:42:36 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Hunt: The Firefighters of New Orleans]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-the-firefighters-of-new-orleans

We've been devastated to see the destruction being caused by the fires in Australia. As headline after headline made its way to our headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany, we decided we would take action. So we have created a special DLC bundle, themed around New Orleans fire fighters of the 1890s. Proceeds from this bundle will go toward the ongoing fire relief efforts for its first two months on sale.

For this benefit, we will be partnering with Wires, Australia's largest wildlife rescue organization. For over 30 years, their mission has been to rehabilitate and preserve Australia wildlife, and to inspire and educate others to do the same. As they say of the current situation on their website: “Summer is a frantically busy time for wildlife rescue and there are still over 100 fires burning in NSW. In December alone there were over 20,000 calls to WIRES 1300 line, a 14% increase on last year, and volunteers attended over 3,300 rescues."

So, until March 31st, 2020, all of the proceeds from the Fire Fight bundle will go toward supporting their efforts. After that, the items will still be available as usual. A note: the charity benefit event will be for PC-only, though of course Xbox and PlayStation players will also get access to the Fire Fight items in March.

Skip the details, and buy it now.

The Fire Fight Bundle contains two new Hunt weapons – a heavy knife and a Sparks LRR – dedicated to fire fighters everywhere. The New Orleans Fire Department began in April of 1829, when a group of men organized a volunteer fire department called the Fireman's Charitable Association. After 62 years of volunteer service, the New Orleans Fire Department became a paid fire-fighting force in 1891 – just four years before the main action of Hunt takes place.

In October of 1895, a fire that started in a tenement building took out most of the New Orleans West Bank neighborhood of Algiers. Horse drawn fire trucks arrived to fight the blaze, but they were unable to stop the fire's spread. In memory of these historic fire fights, and with our hats raised to the fire fighters working tirelessly across Australia even now, we dedicate these two new items.

Algiers Phoenix

Christened by the New Orleans Fire Department, the Algiers Phoenix helped several victims “rise from the ashes" when it freed them from the flames devouring the Algiers neighborhood. A heavy knife handy both in an emergency, and in the field.

Fire Torn

Charred but not destroyed, this Sparks LRR is not a testament to the destructive power of fire, but to the resilience of that which withstands it. A symbol of hope for rejuvenation.

***

So grab a copy of the bundle in the next months, and contribute to a good cause while filling out your Hunt gear collection. If you want to find out more about what else we released in our 1.2 Update, check out the 1.2 Update Highlight Video right over here.

With a Hunt server in Oceania, a shout out to all our players in the region! We hope you're all safe. <3

Donate to a good cause! Buy the Fire Fight bundle now.

Don't own Hunt yet? Get a copy for PC on Steam or in the Crytek store, or for Xbox in the Microsoft Store! Hunt launches for PS4 on February 18, 2020.

Still have questions? Stop by the Hunt: Showdown social media channels and let us know:

Discord + XboxClub + Facebook + Twitter + Instagram + Xbox + Steam

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-the-firefighters-of-new-orleans Wed, 19 Feb 2020 19:23:47 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem is Out Now]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/wolcen-lords-of-mayhem-is-out-now

Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem moves out of Steam Early Access and receives its full release for PC today. Achieved with CRYENGINE, the beautiful action RPG game from Wolcen Studio, based in Nice, France, invites players to shape-shift into a customized apocalyptic avatar of destruction as they embark on an epic adventure. Crytek congratulates everyone at Wolcen Studio on the launch.

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Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem features an immersive story with deep lore as players explore a shattered and corrupted world to uncover ancient secrets and hidden truths. Gameplay revolves around fast-paced, dynamic combat, enabling gamers to dodge, dash, and hack and slash through enemies. Players can deploy a range of devastating spells, defend themselves with an asymmetric armor system, and take advantage of a large armory of weapons. Gamers can customize their character to their preferred playing style and level-up however they choose, with the freedom to play without class restrictions.

Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem presents a beautiful, dangerous, and mysterious world of witchcraft, ancient cults, and warmongers for players to conquer alone or cooperatively in online multiplayer. The game’s deep focus on customization and modifiers allows players to develop their character with unique and deadly skills as they collect loot, unravel mysteries, and take on hordes of opponents. Gamers can experience the gripping gameplay, merciless enemies, and incredible graphics featured in Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem by buying the game from Steam.

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Discover more about Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem by visiting https://wolcengame.com/

Are you picking up Wolcen? Let us know your thoughts on this stunning game on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Don’t forget to join our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in our engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/wolcen-lords-of-mayhem-is-out-now Thu, 13 Feb 2020 17:59:10 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Bringing The Climb to Oculus Quest]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/bringing-the-climb-to-oculus-quest

Our award-winning VR rock climbing game, The Climb, launched on Oculus Quest in December of last year. The game invites players to experience the adrenaline rush of extreme free solo rock climbing as they ascend to epic heights, explore caves, and find shortcuts. Its arrival on the wireless Oculus Quest adds a new dimension to the gameplay experience, and the game is an amazing example of what CRYENGINE can achieve on a mobile chipset. We sat down with Hussein Dari, Lead Level Designer, Sebastien Laurent, Technical Director, Theodor Mader, Lead Rendering Engineer, and Fatih Özbayram, Lead Producer to find out about the development and design process.

Hey guys, thanks for joining us. How pleased are you with how The Climb plays on Oculus Quest?

Fatih: Our goal was to compromise as little as possible to ensure the same immersive and awe-inspiring experience on Quest, and I think it is fair to say this was achieved!

Theo: I really love how natural the climbing feels and how scary the heights are. And of course the impressive vistas! The Oculus Quest version is a step forward for this experience, with more freedom of movement and none of the restrictions of cables.

Hussein: Our aim was not just to port The Climb to the Quest, but also to deliver an experience as faithful as possible to the original game. The Climb runs great and still looks very good on the new device, and that’s without changing any of the gameplay or level layouts.

Sebastien: I think it's really humbling to see what our team has achieved here. The game is visually stunning and plays beautifully. The reviews we get from the players show how impressive an achievement this is. Regarding the gameplay, one of the main differences when comparing the Quest version to the Rift and Touch combination is that the controllers can easily end up outside of the Quest's sensor range. Due to the nature of our gameplay, this situation happens often, so we had to handle that case as gracefully as possible, and I think the result is very satisfying.

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How does going wireless change the experience?

Fatih: One of the most significant changes that the Quest introduces is that players can stand up and move freely as there are no cables to manage. While we had to optimize the game to fit into memory constraints and to meet the target fps to create a smooth experience, the rock climbing experience feels as immersive on Quest as it does on Rift.

Hussein: It makes climbing more fun as you aren’t limited by the distance of the cable to your PC. You can climb wherever you are. We had a lot of cases in the studio where somebody just carried their device over and showed you something cool that they discovered. Moving to the Oculus Quest also gave us some really positive things. For instance, we don’t need to “rotate” the player body while you are climbing as much as in the original game, and, as in the original, climbing with Motion Controllers is way more fun and realistic.

What were the challenges of bringing The Climb to less powerful hardware, but still ensuring an awesome experience?

Sebastien: There was a large amount of work to be done, and I want to thank our Systems team here, for they had to make sure the engine runs properly on ARM CPUs, make our first Linux-based client application (the OS on the Oculus Quest is based on Android), and they had to solve a bunch of new problems that are specific to mobile platforms such as thermal throttling and battery consumption. There was also a shared effort to make The Climb fit into the very tight memory constraints of the Oculus Quest. Even though our Systems and Rendering teams did a wonderful job making our systems more compact and eliminating overhead, we also needed to re-think our approach to building levels in The Climb to make them fit, as our initial approach was more focused on reducing loading times. The other aspect that I would like to mention is much less visible to the outside world, but still an important one. Our whole pipeline had to factor in the new platform so we needed to streamline our workflows such that our programmers and content creators were as efficient as possible. That included features from project generation to build packaging, including, of course, deployment to the device.

Theo: Porting a PC game to a portable, battery-powered device like the Oculus Quest is a challenge. Not only are key characteristics like memory bandwidth and numerical computation speed significantly different to PC, but also new constraints come into play. For instance, the battery drain needs constant supervision, and without external cooling, the devices can heat up quickly if pushed too hard. The GPU architecture is also significantly different from mainstream PC GPUs, requiring customized solutions to get the best performance. It was a learning process for us, but in the end, it helped us to optimize both CRYENGINE and the CRYENGINE renderer to a whole new level.

Hussein: Many people didn’t notice that in the original version of The Climb, all the levels were part of one big level. We chose this approach because, at the very beginning of the project, we had technical difficulties in rendering loading screens. Later during production, we were able to get loading screens in, but by then, it was too late to separate the levels. We used the loading screens to make the level transitions smoother and hide render artifacts.In one of our early tests, we noticed that the original big map wouldn’t run on the Oculus Quest. So we decided to separate one of the levels out and see if the Quest could run it. After the test was successful, we knew that we had to split all 15 levels into single levels. As we used one big level before, all the level and code logic that was designed and optimized needed to be rewritten to handle cases where information has to carry from one level to another.

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How pleased are you with the performance of CRYENGINE on this chipset?

Sebastien: The Climb definitely proved that even though CRYENGINE has always been renowned for pushing the boundaries on high end machines, it can scale down to more modest hardware and shine. Now that we've paved the way, we're excited to bring all of these learnings and improvements to our community and licensees in the future and see what they come up with. This work will definitely open up a lot of new doors and opportunities for people working with CRYENGINE.

Theo: We have learnt a lot about this specific chipset during the development of The Climb Quest port, and this directly reflects in the performance of CRYENGINE on the Quest device. There are, of course, always further improvements to be made, but I believe we have nailed the most important ones while porting this game.  We are quite pleased with the outcome.Mobile, in general, is a very hot topic for CRYENGINE at the moment and while I can't give any details right now, I can tell you that we have some very cool things to look forward to.

How did CRYENGINE help you achieve your vision?

Theo: We decided from the start to build the rendering pipeline based on the Vulkan Graphics API. Vulkan gives developers much finer control over the device than OpenGL, enabling us to squeeze every last bit of performance from the hardware. Another advantage of CRYENGINE is the strong implementation of physically based shading. It lets artists recreate almost any surface from the real world, and the faithful light-material interactions greatly help the immersion of the players in the game.

Hussein: The new version of the engine has lots of new features and optimizations, which made it easier to reach our goal. One of the cool new features is better Python support. It was very easy for us level designers to create small scripts which helped us to automate lots of processes. As mentioned, we now had 15 separate levels, and some changes had to be merged to each, sometimes with small alterations. This was solved very quickly with scripts.

Sebastien: CRYENGINE is, at its core, a cross-platform engine, and as such most systems are extendable. This was a huge help when developing a game for a new device and platform.

What do you think was the biggest achievement for the team?

Sebastien: This project involved a lot of new challenges for us. We had a new hardware platform, new operating system, new CPU architecture, new GPU architecture, new input devices, new tools, well, you get the picture. We also pushed the Vulkan mobile pipeline both for our engine and for the platform, which led to some improvements on their tools and drivers. All in all, I think that the biggest achievement was managing to release such a high quality product when facing so many unknowns.

Theo: When we started working on the project, we were not sure how much of the visual fidelity, we would be able to preserve on the Oculus Quest device. The screen resolution and the high frame rate were difficult targets to hit, and it required a lot of brainstorming and out-of-the-box thinking to come up with solutions. But in the end, we managed to bring the core visual experience and the core gameplay experience to the device.

Hussein: At Crytek, we’re known for shipping games that look amazing. We could have made our lives way easier by just reducing the quality of the game and porting it over. But our biggest achievement was to ensure the game still looks amazing and plays amazing, all while reaching the target fps.

Cheers, guys!

As ever, we look forward to your feedback in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/bringing-the-climb-to-oculus-quest Tue, 18 Feb 2020 16:57:21 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Meet the Team: Roman Perezogin, Junior Technical Designer]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-roman-perezogin-junior-technical-designer

Roman Perezogin moved from being part of the CRYENGINE community to working with our engine every day to serve the CRYENGINE community. Roman is one of our tutorial hosts, and in today’s interview, we learn about his journey and how his experience of being part of the community helps him in his current role as Junior Technical Designer.

Hey Roman! Can you tell us a bit about your background and your history with CRYENGINE?

Hey! Well, I am from Germany, and now living here in Frankfurt. I started out as a graphic designer, but it turned out the job was not a good fit for me. Since I loved playing games, I kind of wanted to create my own worlds and my own stories. So I started to learn a few things about game development. I began with Unreal in my first steps with game development but I couldn't get my head around it. So I tried other engines and when I discovered CRYENGINE, I immediately felt like home because I was able to understand the basics of the engine really quickly. This was about five or six years ago.

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How did you get to join Crytek and get into your current role?

I was working on my solo project, an open world horror game with CRYENGINE and I received huge support from Crytek and the community team. I was invited to the studio, they took me with them to conventions, so I was able to present my game, and it was amazing! However, I actually grew tired of developing a game on my own for almost four years. I wanted to join the people I loved to work with and who supported me, so when I got the opportunity to join Crytek, I jumped at it. Shout out to Gabriel here!

What is your main focus at the moment?

To be honest, I want to work out my Grandma’s amazing vanilla cake recipe! It’s been bugging me for months now, and she won’t tell me her secret. But besides that, my main focus is to develop myself and learn as much as I can. Even though I had built up great experience working with CRYENGINE as an indie developer, a AAA workflow is quite different. Not only that but with so many amazingly talented people around the studio, you just want to suck up as much of their wisdom as possible. So you try to learn all the amazing and interesting things you can and try to adapt. I love it. There is always, always something new to learn every day at Crytek, and then I get to use the knowledge to improve the quality of the experience for people using our engine.

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How does it feel to make the switch from being part of the community to working on CRYENGINE for the community?

Joining Crytek was really enlightening. With the experience of an indie dev and no background in AAA game development, it was only when I joined Crytek that I actually learned what all the really complex systems “behind the curtain” actually do. The experience of working with CRYENGINE previously gave me the perspective of an indie dev and a connection to the community. It's helping me to target the needs of our community and use that knowledge to guide the future of tutorials and improvements for the engine.

What’s been your most satisfying moment working with CRYENGINE at Crytek?

That's a tough question! There are a lot of great moments, but getting to interact with our community at all the different conferences is something I really enjoy.

How does a regular day at work look like for you?

To begin with, it involves a lot of coffee! Then checking my mails and our official discord channel, which you should definitely join, and then getting to work, opening a new build of the engine, and thinking about more coffee while the engine starts up. And then I get to work, develop amazing stuff, learn and create!

What does it take to do your job well?

Passion and commitment. You have to be ready to absorb a lot of knowledge from the incredibly talented artists and programmers here and understand what they are trying to teach you, and then use that knowledge to create something great. I think it takes a fascination for the industry too. My passion is all about breathtaking technology and its possibilities, and to learn from the amazing minds here. You need to be committed to learning, then covert that knowledge into skill, and then convey that knowledge to the community.

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Have you got any tips for anyone aspiring to work in your field?

To quote a phrase, just do it! One of the most important tips I have, though, is to really understand what you are doing. Understand what you are trying to achieve. Learn about the basics and the foundations of your task. You want to create animations and play them in the engine, for example? Then learn and understand what animations are and what they do, the low level basics, and take baby steps. Understand how the engine handles animations, and what happens in the background. This will give you amazing analytical skills, and you will be able to debug whatever troubles you encounter.

What are you most looking forward to coming to the engine?

Visual Scripting, of course. I absolutely love working with our new visual scripting tool.

What are you playing at the moment?

Breath of the Wild, which is an amazing and relaxing game. I also play a lot of party games with friends. I’m really looking forward to Cyberpunk 2077 and, of course, loving our very own Hunt: Showdown.

Cheers, Roman!

Join Roman over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. Our team is always collating your feedback on our channels, so if you have suggestions about the engine or future tutorials, do let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Would you like to follow Roman’s path from the community to working on our team? We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-roman-perezogin-junior-technical-designer Fri, 07 Feb 2020 16:18:10 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Art Asset Pipeline Tutorial]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-tutorial

In a new Master Class tutorial series, Alin Alexa, one of our Technical Support Specialists, takes you step-by-step through a proven-in-production art asset pipeline. The first video in this series demonstrates how to create physical collision proxies for your assets in 3DS Max, and then get them into the engine using the CryExporter tools, in this case focusing on the CryMax plugin. The same process is also shown using an FBX pipeline so you can pick your favored workflow.

A collision proxy is a geometric model that is used for calculations in the physics module of CRYENGINE. This includes physical collisions, friction and physical raycasts to name just a few. They also provide the opportunity to simplify the physical model compared to the rendered mesh to optimize for performance. The tutorial explains the purpose and principles behind these physical proxies, as well as a practical walkthrough of both the CryTools and FBX pipelines, in just under 15 minutes

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for the next tutorial in this series, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-tutorial Wed, 05 Feb 2020 16:00:43 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[New character attachments tutorial]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/new-character-attachments-tutorial

In our latest Master Class, Roman Perezogin, one of our Junior Technical Designers, takes you step-by-step through the process of using the attachment system in CRYENGINE’s character tool. In just over ten minutes, you’ll be shown a practical workflow that you can follow along with and apply to your own projects.

The tutorial follows on from Roman’s previous tutorial in which he demonstrates how to create a character and import it into CRYENGINE by using Character Creator 3 and iClone 7. If you wish to follow along with this new video, and you do not already have a character with animations and a generated character definition file in your project, we recommend that you watch that tutorial first.

This new video demonstrates how the character pipeline uses an attachment system to customize the appearance of a character model in a variety of ways. This allows you to apply different skins and accessories to characters so you can create unique looks. In this tutorial, Roman looks at the skin and joint attachments, and other attachment types will be covered in a future tutorial. 

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel. 

We hope you find this tutorial useful. If you’re looking for more tutorials, don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/new-character-attachments-tutorial Thu, 30 Jan 2020 16:01:57 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Get set for Global Game Jam 2020!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/get-set-for-global-game-jam-2020

Global Game Jam 2020 is the world’s largest game jam. People from all backgrounds and with different levels of experience come together to develop games in just 48 hours, based on a theme only revealed when the event begins. Global Game Jam 2020 begins on January 31, and you can find out how to join thousands of developers across the globe entering the event by visiting https://globalgamejam.org/. Find a game jam near you and sign up!

A game jam is all about creating and iterating quickly, so CRYENGINE is, of course, ideal for anyone thinking about entering. Crytek entered four teams last year, and you can check out those games, learn about how they were created, and find out about the experience of team members who took part in a series of articles below:

Homebound

Available for you to download from the CRYENGINE Marketplace, check out Homebound, a game where you have to make your way home from a tavern on a stormy night. A crew of six people created the game in just 48 hours. Find out how the team set about the task and pick up some hints and tips for creating games quickly in our case study.

Haven

Haven invites you to explore a beautiful skyscape. Find out more in our interview with the team.

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Escape Home

Play the role of a blind teenager in stealth game Escape Home. Learn more in our Q&A.

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Get out and Play

Become a child who must help their mother and explore a charming island in Get out and Play. Read all about it in our blog with insights from the team.

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Top Tips from our team members who took part last year:

“Build a working prototype as quickly as possible. It doesn’t matter if the prototype looks good, just have a base and then expand your idea, instead of doing everything at once.” – Lukas Keil, Junior Audio Designer

“From the very beginning, keep the scope small. I would also recommend setting several small milestones, such as creating a moving player, which will help keep everyone motivated.” – Joshua Nuttall, Junior Software Engineer.

“It’s better to start with a small scope. You should build one core feature for the game, which feels good and then add different elements to it. It’s better to have a small polished game than a big one with lots of features that aren’t finished or feel clunky.” – Manuel Härtl, Junior Programmer for Hunt: Showdown

Assets and Resources:

To help you get prepared, we’ve pulled together a few resources so you can hit the ground running when Global Game Jam 2020 kicks off.

If you’re taking part, sign up to our official Discord channel where our teams will be posting updates about their progress, and you can chat with fellow devs taking part in the challenge live. You can also join the official Global Game Jam Discord, and if Twitter is your thing, stay up to date and share your progress with the hashtag #CryJam.

Creating a game jam game is all about speed, scope, and iteration. A great place to start is checking out our Galaxysys Sample Project, which you can download for free from the CRYENGINE Marketplace, showing what you can achieve in a limited amount of time. You can read insights from members of the team who made the game in our interview.

We also have a huge range of asset packs which are available for free from the CRYENGINE Marketplace. We’ve picked out a few of our favorites which are worth downloading in advance, so you have drop-in-and-play props to get you going quickly:

Ryse Nature Pack

A collection of high quality plants and bushes as used in Ryse: Son of Rome.

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Wilderness Assets

A versatile package of trees and grass.

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Ryse World Building Assets

A great sample that you can mod for your Global Game Jam project.

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Rock Textures

A wide variety of fantastic rock textures.

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Building Blocks

Construction blocks and iron fencing, ideal for an urban, industrial, or building site scene.

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All these assets are game-ready, require no plugins, and will help you realize a range of different projects, so get downloading.

Tutorials and Documentation:

If you’re new to CRYENGINE, we recommend checking out the CRYENGINE GameSDK Sample Project, which shows you how to set up a level.

Video Tutorials:

We have a range of tutorials to help you with different aspects of game development with our engine. Our FlappyBoid tutorial is a great step-by-step guide to creating a complete game with CRYENGINE for beginners. You can also head to our YouTube channel to check out a wide range of tutorials, covering everything from creating animated characters, to using the Mannequin Editor to program animated characters, prepping to use C++ with CRYENGINE, and adding audio using Fmod Studio.

Written Documentation:

We also suggest bookmarking the official CRYENGINE documentation. A few pieces you may wish to check out before beginning the event include our Getting Started guide, our guide to the editor tools, the section on entities and components, the console and config file reference, and the technical documentation for programmers.

Global Game Jam is an amazing event, and we can’t wait to see what the CRYENGINE community creates!

Connect with the community over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel and stay tuned to everything CRYENGINE on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity. We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/get-set-for-global-game-jam-2020 Tue, 28 Jan 2020 16:40:00 +0100 Crytek