CRYENGINE | The complete solution for next generation game development by Crytek https://www.cryengine.com/ The most powerful game development platform for you and your team to create world-class entertainment experiences. en-US Copyright 2021, Crytek GmbH. Wed, 22 Sep 2021 16:21:54 +0200 Wed, 22 Sep 2021 20:02:04 +0200 60 <![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Debugging Your Game]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-debugging-your-game

Master the debugging process with episode 14 of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy. If you’re new to the series, the CRYENGINE Summer Academy is aimed at both newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. Catch up with all the episodes released so far below.

Take a deep dive into the world of debugging as your regular host, Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin, is joined by Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall and Technical Community Manager Jeremy Wade. In this extensive two-hour episode, you’ll learn about the different ways to debug your game in CRYENGINE. You’ll be shown the various tools that our engine provides to understand the events that happen in your game and learn how to debug issues to improve the experience for your players. You’ll also learn how to improve your game’s performance and pick up a range of tricks and tips about debugging. 

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

Episode 6A: Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms. 

Episode 6B: Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events. 

Bonus Tutorial: Create a character with Mixamo

Episode 7: Animate your character with blendspaces

Episode 8: Code simple animation mechanics

Episode 9: Take a deep dive into CRYENGINE’s animation system

Episode 10: Lighting techniques with Learning Manager Brian Dilg. 

Episode 11: 90-minute Particle Effect tutorial with Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes

Episode 12: Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes delivers a deep dive into our powerful Particle Editor

Episode 13: Audio Design with our audio experts Dominik Zingler and Lukas Keil

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-debugging-your-game Wed, 22 Sep 2021 16:21:54 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Shaping Audible Landscapes]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-shaping-audible-landscapes

Episode 13 of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy is out now, and it’s all about audio! The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is a series aimed at newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. If you’re new to the series, we have listed all episodes released so far below.

Your regular host, Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin, is joined by audio experts Dominik Zingler and Lukas Keil for today's episode. During this 80 minute+ video, Dominik and Lukas give an in-depth overview about how they approached and implemented the audio design for Breeze. The guys deliver practical tips about using Fmod with CRYENGINE and introduce you to the Audio Control Editor in our engine. You’ll also be shown how to implement sounds directly from Fmod in CRYENGINE, from the sounds of the breeze in “Breeze” to the sounds of footsteps on the beach. In addition to showing you practical workflows, this episode is packed with useful audio tips and tricks from two experts who have worked on the audio design of our own games. 

To dive further into the world of audio, you can also check out our written documentation here.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

Episode 6A: Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms. 

Episode 6B: Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events. 

Bonus Tutorial: Create a character with Mixamo

Episode 7: Animate your character with blendspaces

Episode 8: Code simple animation mechanics

Episode 9: Take a deep dive into CRYENGINE’s animation system

Episode 10: Lighting techniques with Learning Manager Brian Dilg. 

Episode 11: 90-minute Particle Effect tutorial with Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes 

Episode 12: Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes delivers a deep dive into our powerful Particle Editor

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-shaping-audible-landscapes Thu, 16 Sep 2021 15:56:23 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Cat-Herding Particle Effects]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-cat-herding-particle-effects

Learn how to use the Particle Editor for a range of different and diverse functions in episode 12 of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy. The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is a series aimed at newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. If you’re new to the series, we have listed all episodes released so far below.

Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin is joined by Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes for a 90-minute in-depth presentation and discussion about how you can use CRYENGINE’s powerful and flexible Particle Editor for a wide range of different effects and functions, including some unexpected ones! The video covers many of the particles that you can see in Breeze were created, including the falling leaves and wind effect on the sea. The discussion goes much further, presenting a range of other implementations, including how you can use the Particle Editor to create fur for a cat!  The video includes practical workflows used in Breeze and will arm you with a wealth of knowledge about how you can use the Particle Editor to great effect in your own projects. 

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

Episode 6A: Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms. 

Episode 6B: Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events. 

Bonus Tutorial: Create a character with Mixamo

Episode 7: Animate your character with blendspaces

Episode 8: Code simple animation mechanics

Episode 9: Take a deep dive into CRYENGINE’s animation system

Episode 10: Lighting techniques with Learning Manager Brian Dilg. 

Episode 11: 90-minute Particle Effect tutorial with Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes 

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-cat-herding-particle-effects Wed, 08 Sep 2021 15:58:22 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Staff Spotlight: Meet the Team: Arto Ruotsalainen]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-staff-spotlight-meet-the-team-arto-ruotsalainen

Today we're joined by Arto, CRYENGINE's new Head of Product, who has recently started with us to help shape the now and the future of the engine. Find out about Arto's passion for games, journey to CRYENGINE, and his and the team's vision for the engine in our latest interview.

Hey Arto! Welcome and thanks for joining us. Can you tell us a bit about your background?

I have been involved in the real-time graphics industry for over 15 years. My career started as a hobby when my big brother brought me a Borland Delphi programming environment. I was around nine years old at the time, and naturally, as an avid gamer, I fell in love with game programming.

What started as a passion for game programming quickly became an urge to learn how the underlying technologies worked. So, I spent almost a decade building my own graphics engines and demos on top of them to showcase what I had learned. Eventually, these showcases led me to an interview at a company called Hybrid Graphics, known for various real-time 3D graphics solutions across everything from PC to mobile platforms. I was hired on the spot, kicking off my professional career in the real-time graphics industry!

Nvidia later acquired Hybrid Graphics, and I spent two years there working on GPU drivers until I craved making something more visible again. This led me to work at Futuremark, known for its 3DMark graphics benchmarks. Between Futuremark and Crytek, I spent over a decade building various real-time graphics-related companies. I love technology and bridging the gap to the market to deliver the right product that will solve the issues our customers and partners face.

What was your journey to CRYENGINE?

I guess we could say the journey started back when I was nine years old. Still, if we look at it through my professional career, I have always had massive respect for how game engine companies like Crytek have pushed the boundaries of real-time experiences across platforms. I have always loved challenges and learning, and that is what this industry is all about. You must keep learning and adapting. This industry never sleeps. It combines various technologies and talents to create and innovate. That is what makes it such an interesting and challenging but rewarding environment to work in. And that is what attracted me to Crytek.

The challenge we have as a team is to push boundaries and show the world the future of next-generation AAA experiences. This has always been in the DNA of Crytek, a company that, during the past 20 years, has consistently shown how the bar can be raised. So, what better place to be?

How do you see the engine now, and how do you see it evolving in the future?

As many of you know already, we have been quiet for some time. And there is a reason for that.

We are focused on making the next generation of CRYENGINE, which will provide a platform for creating on-demand AAA experiences across high-end platforms. What we mean by on-demand is the future of cloud and edge computation use cases. To achieve this, we had to go back to the drawing board to re-vision the architecture for future real-time interactive experiences.

The future is more versatile and more spread out in terms of how content creation and computation in general can be achieved, which means CRYENGINE needs to offer scalability beyond what we see today to provide the means to meet the demand of the market.

I am excited about the path we are on. CRYENGINE's positioning to the market is very focused and will present a unique solution for meeting the challenges that developers around the world will face in the years ahead.

What do you see as the most exciting elements on CRYENGINE's roadmap?

First of all, the roadmap is going to change again. But we aren't quite ready to share the full scope of it in public yet. While we understand that this is what you all have been waiting for, we need a bit more time to give you a comprehensive overview and timeline. Change is good, but it also takes time. And, of course, the Covid-19 pandemic has disrupted our business.

We appreciate that you are all here with us, still, to look forward to the future of CRYENGINE. There are plenty of exciting things to come, but without revealing too much yet, I would say the following features are what I am looking forward to most:

Flexibility of our on-demand architecture is definitely going to be one. It offers the means to solve some really complex problems that the industry faces now and issues it will face in the upcoming years. Flexibility will be also be addressed and expressed through our brand-new visual scripting language that has come very far since we shared the first Schematyc Beta.

At the same time, I am very excited about our upcoming toolchain to ease content creation and features focused on high-fidelity experiences.I can assure you that we have not forgotten the meaning of "But, can it run Crysis?"

Speaking more generally about the future of technology in this space, I am looking forward to the next generation of hardware, new ways of storytelling and content creation, plus real-time computing. There are many emerging technologies to come that will change how we create and power interactive experiences.

How important is community for the team?

I have already had the privilege to speak with many of our partners and licensees, and I am looking to engage with the community a lot more in the future, including revealing more details about our plans and the roadmap ahead. It goes without saying that community is our top priority and the plans we have set reflect that. Our roadmap already includes many requests from licensees and the community. We will continue to evolve it with your feedback in mind. Please keep your feedback coming, as it is heard and helps us shape the future of the engine.

So… when are we going to see the next generation of CRYENGINE?

Well, we have already set out our internal timelines, but due to the nature of building something new, we must wait a little longer before announcing the exact timelines for everyone externally.  Our current timeline aims to address the most important issues creating bottlenecks for the CRYENGINE Developer community. By the end of this year, we will have one more release concluding the CRYENGINE V lifecycle by adding Scaleform 4 support, the GamePlatformPlugin, and new launcher functionalities, along with numerous bug fixes and other improvements. Then we will be ready to open a new chapter in the CRYENGINE chronicles in 2022.

What are you playing at the moment?

Right now, Hunt: Showdown and Post Scriptum, as I love challenging games that require more strategic thinking and learning than your traditional "casual" games. But for my all-time favorites, I spent a lot of time playing games like Fallout II, Diablo II, Company of Heroes, Baldurs Gate, Ultima Online, and Rainbow Six: Rogue Spear.

Thanks for taking the time to share your vision and plans for CRYENGINE with us.

My pleasure, the team here is hard at work, and the future looks really bright. I look forward to sharing more updates with the community as soon as we can.

Cheers, Arto!

As Arto says, community is our top priority. Let us know your feedback and thoughts about the engine in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Pick up tips and tricks about our engine, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity. We actively encourage people from all backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-staff-spotlight-meet-the-team-arto-ruotsalainen Mon, 06 Sep 2021 16:03:03 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Stylized Particle Effect Tutorial]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-stylized-particle-effect-tutorial

Welcome to episode 11 of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy, focusing on particle effects and using our engine’s Particle Editor. The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is a series aimed at newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. If you’re new to the series, we have listed all episodes released so far below.

In today’s episode, Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin is joined by Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes for an in-depth 90-minute presentation all about particles. The video reverse engineers the process that Viktor used to create the soaring seagulls that you can see in Breeze. You’ll be taken through each of the features used to create the seagulls, and Viktor explains what each process does to bring the simulation alive. This practical tutorial shows you methods and techniques to apply to your own projects and includes tips and insights about creating particles and using CRYENGINE’s Particle Editor that will be invaluable for anyone using our engine.



New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move.

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms.

Episode 6A:  Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms.

Episode 6B:  Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events.

Bonus Tutorial: Create a character with Mixamo

Episode 7: Animate your character with blendspaces

Episode 8: Code simple animation mechanics

Episode 9: Take a deep dive into CRYENGINE’s animation system

Episode 10: Lighting techniques with Learning Manager Brian Dilg. 

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-stylized-particle-effect-tutorial Wed, 01 Sep 2021 15:59:58 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Lighting Techniques]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-lighting-techniques

Episode 10 of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy is out today, focusing on lighting techniques to make your worlds shine. The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is a series aimed at newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. If you’re new to the series, we have listed all episodes released so far below.

Today’s episode features Learning Manager Brian Dilg in conversation with your regular host Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin. Over the course of 90 minutes, they discuss lighting in CRYENGINE and, in particular, the lighting in Breeze. The episode is packed full of tips and tricks for lighting your own scenes and features discussions about achieving different aesthetic moods, day and night lighting, using volumetric fog effectively, and much more. Brian also introduces a range of interesting lighting techniques and gives practical advice about implementing them for the scenes in your game.  

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move.

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms.

Episode 6A:  Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms.

Episode 6B:  Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events.

Bonus Tutorial: Create a character with Mixamo

Episode 7: Animate your character with blendspaces

Episode 8: Code simple animation mechanics

Episode 9: Take a deep dive into CRYENGINE’s animation system

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-lighting-techniques Wed, 25 Aug 2021 16:17:11 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Animation System]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-animation-system

The CRYENGINE Summer Academy continues with Episode 9, which gives you insights into our engine’s animation systems. The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is a series aimed at newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. If you’re new to the series, we have listed all episodes released so far below.

Today’s episode will help you build out your understanding of animation in CRYENGINE following the previous step-by-step animation tutorials.  Animation Programmer Claudio Freda joins your regular host Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin to deliver you a comprehensive overview of the animation system in CRYENGINE, including how animations work in the engine and how animations interact with code. This video was originally live streamed on Twitch, and over the course of 100 minutes, the conversation covers both practical advice and explanations of our engine’s animation systems. It will arm you with a wealth of knowledge and understanding to bring to your own projects.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

Episode 6A:  Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms. 

Episode 6B:  Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events. 

Bonus Tutorial: Create a character with Mixamo

Episode 7: Animate your character with Blendspaces

Episode 8: Code simple animation mechanics

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-animation-system Wed, 18 Aug 2021 10:46:30 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Coding Animation]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-coding-animation

Welcome to Episode 8 of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy, which shows you how to use C++ to code basic animation. The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is a series aimed at newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. If you’re new to the series, we have listed all episodes released so far below.

In this episode, Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall introduces you to the simple animation code mechanics used in Breeze. You’ll be shown how to create a simple "Jump" animation in code. And, as they say, what goes up must come down, so you’ll also be shown how to add a landing animation into the mix, as well as how to create an extendable setup for you to explore with your character. Using the fuel can in Breeze as an example, you’ll also be shown how to animate attachments being added to your character too.

This practical tutorial lasts just under 30 minutes and shows you how to code, set and tweak the parameters for animation, and set idling animations for when no movement is taking place. 

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

Episode 6A:  Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms. 

Episode 6B:  Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events. 

Bonus Tutorial: Create a character with Mixamo

Episode 7: Animate your character with blendspaces

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-coding-animation Fri, 13 Aug 2021 15:59:07 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Animating Your Character]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-animating-your-character

Episode 7 of the CRYENGINE Summer Academy shows you a step-by-step process for animating a player character. If you don’t know already, The CRYENGINE Summer Academy is a series aimed at newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some game dev experience, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid. If you’re new to the series, we have listed all episodes released so far below.

Today’s episode, hosted by Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin, shows you how to use an example file to insert animations and create a locomotion blendspace for your character. Follow along with a simple drag and drop process that will allow you to replace or insert all the animations required for creating basic locomotion for a player character. Roman also explains core concepts in the blendspace editor, like examples and annotations. By the end of the video, you’ll have learned how to create basic locomotion from just a few animations in this fun tutorial that lasts under 15 minutes.

You can deepen your understanding of blendspaces by checking out our written documentation.

We also recommend checking out Roman’s Masterclass below, which shows you how to use Mixamo’s extensive library of animations and make them CRYENGINE-ready and usable on a playable character by reorienting them.

If you need a character for your project, check out this handy tutorial guide.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

Episode 6A:  Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms. 

Episode 6B:  Coding in C++ - Create objects that can be dropped in a zone to trigger events. 

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page. 

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-animating-your-character Thu, 05 Aug 2021 15:59:21 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Creating a Character]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-creating-a-character

Today’s tutorial blog is the a recap of helpful tutorials letting you take the next step in the CRYENGINE Summer Academy, our series which shows you the fundamentals of game development, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid.  This series is for both newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some experience of game dev. If you’re new to the series, begin with episode 1, or check out all of the episodes listed towards the end of the blog.

Overview – Character Creation Pipeline

This written tutorial will take you through all the steps you need to create a character for your game from the very beginning. We will use Mixamo and links to our previous tutorials, which will guide you through the entire process. You can follow along with this guide and bookmark it as a future reference for your projects. We’re going to follow the same steps we used to create the character that you can see in Breeze, so, without further ado, let’s go!

Download a character and animations

First, we need a character, so head to Mixamo and download a sample character. You can use any character you like, but we chose the charming robot character you can see in Breeze.

You also want to download some animations for your character from Mixamo to use in CRYENGINE.

Select the following animations:

  • Falling Idle
  • Idle
  • Jumping
  • Left Strafe Walk
  • Right Strafe Walk
  • Left Strafe Run
  • Right Strafe Run
  • Left Turn 90 degrees
  • Right Turn 90 degrees
  • Running
  • Slow Jog Backwards
  • Walking

There are plenty of other animations available that you can also download and use, but these provide us with the minimum basic locomotion we require for Breeze.

Reorient animations and add a root bone

Now we need to reorient the animations and add a root bone, so CRYENGINE can use the animations and work with our robot as a playable character.

We know that our users like to use different kinds of software, so we have three different tutorials for 3DS Max, Maya, and Blender showing you how to complete this process for each. If you don’t have a chosen application yet, the links below will take you to the website where you can download the software you wish to use:

  1. 3DS Max 
  2. Maya
  3. Blender 

The chances are that you already have your favorite, but if not, Blender is completely free, so it is a good place to start.

So, once you have your software, now watch the corresponding step-by-step tutorial, which will show you how to reorient the project and animations, ready for CRYENGINE:

  1. 3DS Max Tutorial
  2. Maya Tutorial
  3. Blender Tutorial

Export to CRYENGINE

Next, you’ll need to export those files to CRYENGINE. The tutorial below will show you how to do this for 3DS Max, Maya, and Blender:

Create locomotion and blendspaces

Now we want to make our reoriented and exported character moveable! To understand how to create locomotion and use blendspaces, check out this handy tutorial: 

Mannequin setup

Once we have locomotion set up, now we need to set up a mannequin too. This video will show you exactly how to do it: 

Make your character playable

And finally, we want to make our playable character. Follow along with this tutorial, and it will be so:

And now you’ve been through all the steps to create your new playable character!

Don’t worry if some of these steps seem complicated. Once you’ve done it a few times, it becomes a swift process and, soon, second nature.

Next steps: Create a character controller

Now you have a playable character, check out how to create a character controller by watching our in-depth tutorial delivered by Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall: 

CRYENGINE Summer Academy listings

Check out all of the entries in our CRYENGINE Summer Academy series here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6: Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

Episode 6 A: Coding in C++ - Learn how to create bouncing platforms for your players. 

Episode 6 B: Coding in C++ - Create a pickup & collection Zone in your levels.

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-creating-a-character Tue, 24 Aug 2021 13:02:07 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy: Bouncing Platforms & Pickup Zone]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-bouncing-platforms-pickup-zone

Learn more about C++ coding with two new tutorial episodes in the CRYENGINE Summer Academy, our series which shows you the fundamentals of game development, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid.  This series is for both newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with some experience of game dev.

Today we release extra episodes in our coding tutorial mini-series presented by Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall. These step-by-step tutorials use Visual Studio and our engine and assume that you have a basic understanding of programming. If you're new to the series, we recommend that you catch up with all the episodes listed below today's tutorials, including part one and part two of this coding mini-series which shows you how to create a player controller and how to code basic platform gameplay mechanics respectively.

In Episode 6A, Joshua builds on explaining how you can create falling platforms in Episode 6 by showing you how to code bouncing platforms. Using Entity Area Events, amongst other techniques, you’ll learn how to enable a player to jump on a surface and fly through the air.

And in Episode 6B, Joshua walks you through the step-by-step process of creating an object pick-up zone. The tutorial shows you how to set up objects such as fuel cans that can be picked up and taken to a collection area to trigger an event, in this case, launching a rocket!

The tutorial shows you how Entity Area Events can be used to handle events in different ways, for instance, to attach the fuel can to the player or detach the fuel can and place it on the podium.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move. 

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall

Episode 6:  Coding in C++ - Joshua shows you how to implement mechanics like falling platforms. 

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-bouncing-platforms-pickup-zone Wed, 28 Jul 2021 16:07:35 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy Episode 6]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-6

Episode 6 of our CRYENGINE Summer Academy, a fifteen-part series for newcomers to CRYENGINE and those who already have some game dev experience, is available to watch now. The series shows you the fundamentals of game development, using a platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid.

The latest episode is the second part of a coding tutorial mini-series within the CRYENGINE Summer Academy, hosted by Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall. The step-by-step tutorial uses Visual Studio and our engine and assumes that you have a basic understanding of programming. If you're new to the series, we recommend that you catch up with all the episodes listed below today's tutorial, including part one of this coding mini-series which shows you how to create a player controller.

In this tutorial, Joshua shows you how to implement the platforming mechanics seen in Breeze. These mechanics are coded in C++, and you’ll learn how to use various methods and engine features to create different movements and actions. You will see how to make classic platforming features like jumping pads and falling platforms and learn how to add objects like fuel cans that can be picked up and taken to a collection zone to trigger a rocket blasting off!

As these steps are explained in great detail, we have split this lesson up into three bite-sized videos for easier consumption. The first part is releasing today, with two additional mechanics being introduced in two follow-up videos next week. Until then, let us know how you're doing in following our tutorials, and don't forget to like and subscribe to not miss out on the next uploads.

The techniques shown in this video include how to create a new Entity Component from scratch in C++ that exposes variables to the Sandbox Editor for designers to customize in real-time. The falling platform also uses the Trigger Component to activate the mechanic when the player gets within range. This part will form the basis for more components in later parts explaining some of the other mechanics in the Breeze Summer Academy Project.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move.

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

Episode 5:  Coding in C++ - Creating a player controller with Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall.

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-6 Wed, 21 Jul 2021 16:09:38 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy Episode 5 is here!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-5-is-here

Join us for the next episode of our CRYENGINE Summer Academy, a fifteen-part series for newcomers to CRYENGINE and those who already have some game dev experience. The series uses a prototype platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid to show you the fundamentals of game development.

Today's episode is a special tutorial hosted by Support Engineer Joshua Nuttall, who will show you how to set up the character you see in Breeze. The video is a step-by-step tutorial that uses Visual Studio and our engine and assumes that you have a basic understanding of programming. If you're new to the series, catch up with the episodes listed below today's tutorial.

In this episode, the first of several complementary tutorials to augment the Crytek Summer Academy series, Joshua shows you how to add customize the player character and camera in code, including adding sprinting and jumping movements using the 3rd person template as a base. Joshua explains the changes that were made to the default template and code structure to create the Breeze player controller, detailing the topics of initialization, input bindings, movement, and camera logic.

The tutorial shows you how to manipulate and test different variables, including setting the player's velocity as they run on the ground and jump through the air. In addition to movement, Joshua also shows you how to set up the camera just like it is in Breeze. Throughout the tutorial, in addition to practical step-by-step instructions for character and camera movement, Joshua also shows you best practices for adding CVars so designers and artists can easily tweak various functions at runtime.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move.

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

Episode 4:  Low poly assets and environment design with Principal 3D Environment Artist Tom Deerberg.

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-5-is-here Wed, 07 Jul 2021 16:00:25 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Master Class: Character Art Preparation]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-master-class-character-art-preparation

Our latest Master Class is hosted by Character Art Director Abdenour Bachir, who draws upon his years of experience to deliver an in-depth presentation showing character art preparation workflows that you can use in your own projects.

Abdenour covers everything from prototyping a character asset in Max to setting up the asset in CRYENGINE, including syncing materials, lighting, and testing it in the engine.

The Master Class shows you how to take character art assets from 3DS Max into CRYENGINE by importing a highly detailed human head asset, which includes texture types, character-related shaders and materials, pivots, lighting, and environment probes.

You can access this asset and follow along by using our free Game SDK Sample Project with these simple steps:

  1. Download the free GameSDK sample project from the The CRYENGINE Marketplace.
  2. Use the CRYENGINE Launcher to import the GameSDK project
  3. Click on the gear icon next to the imported GameSDK project and choose Reveal in Explorer.
  4. Copy the GameSDK folder to a folder of your choice (we never recommend working with or inside the default launcher folders).
  5. Launch the copied GameSDK project. It needs to be running in order for .cryasset files to be generated.
  6. In the second GameSDK folder, open the objects-part0.pak file in 7Zip or another extractor.
  7. Navigate to the Objects\characters\human\heads\head_a folder and choose extract.
  8. Extract the folder to the same relative folder location, for ex: copied_gamesdk_5.6\GameSDK\GameSDK\objects\characters\human\heads\head_a.
  9. Follow the tutorial and drag the extracted assets into a level.

We always recommend copying the GameSDK project instead of working inside it, as updates can overwrite changes that can cost work.

This Master Class is aimed at those of you with some experience with game development and CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to our engine, we recommend that you download our beginner's course, which shows you how to make a complete game with CRYENGINE, or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-master-class-character-art-preparation Tue, 29 Jun 2021 16:00:37 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy Episode 4!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-4

Join us for the next episode of our CRYENGINE Summer Academy, a fifteen-part series for newcomers to CRYENGINE and those who already have some game dev experience. Learn the fundamentals of game development with your host Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin, who uses a prototype platforming game called Breeze as a learning aid.

Today's episode focuses on environment art and design. Roman is joined by a very special guest, Tom Deerberg, Principal 3D Environment Artist, a highly experienced Crytek veteran who has worked on our Crysis franchise, The Climb games, and Hunt Showdown, amongst others.

In this video, Roman and Tom discuss the workflow for the stylized assets that feature in Breeze, and Tom gives his advice for developers taking their first steps into game-making and starting out with CRYENGINE. He reveals the importance of planning ahead for a new project and why time spent building a collection of reference images before you start modeling assets will pay off. Throughout the video, Tom gives fascinating insights about creating AAA games, his own indie passion project, Ramiwo, and discusses workflows you can apply to your own projects. This episode runs for over an hour and is packed full of great recommendations, tips, guidance, and lessons.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move.

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

Episode 3: Create an island map in minutes with procedural tools.

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-4 Wed, 23 Jun 2021 16:00:02 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Achieved with CRYENGINE - Indie Horror Room 54 is out now]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/achieved-with-cryengine-indie-horror-room-54-is-out-now

Out now on Steam, Room 54 is a horror game focused on exploration, investigation, stealth, and survival. The game is set in 1984 in a remote town where everything is not as it seems. Daniel and his wife Desirè are taking a short winter break, but residents start disappearing in mysterious circumstances. When Desirè disappears without a trace too, only to be found dead, Daniel must find out what happened to her, uncover the truth, and escape with his life using only his wits in a game that provides a unique experience with each playthrough.

Hey Luca, thanks for joining us again! How does it feel to have your game out in the wild?

Now that we have finally completed and released a project from start to finish, I feel really satisfied. I have learned so much during this process.

The overall feedback was quite good, although it’s a bit mixed on Steam. Unfortunately, at launch, the games wasn’t fully polished, and players found a couple of issues that we promptly fixed, along with adding hotfixes. The game was ambitious for a very small team, so I was pretty sure we might miss something in the end. And some of this was caused by inexperience.  Running more beta-testing, especially now that Steam is allowing players to use the new Playtest feature, could be extremely helpful to spot problems for a very small development team like us.

Supporting the game will be important. We will keep working to fix any remaining bugs and add some minor new features to simplify the user experience. At the moment, we do not plan to release any sizeable new content as the game covers the whole story. That said, we do have some ideas of how we could add new content to the game, so if players support it for a while, we may consider it.

How was the experience of creating the game?

During the development and release process, you really learn a lot of things, from the development itself to PR, building an audience, best practices, the Steamworks system, and much, much more. All of this will really help us for our next games. Now that we have released our first game, I think we can start building a community around our games. We are looking for the best way to connect with players, maybe using Discord. Players expect to be in direct contact with developers these days and quicker to deliver any kind of support.

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What advice do you have for other first-time indie devs?

From our experience, I think we have a few pieces of advice that other devs will find useful. First, focus your development on a small but fully functional game. Your first game is like a springboard, it’s your introduction to the world of game development, and it will be your first showcase to build your portfolio of skills and competencies as an individual and as a company. Second, don’t overload yourself with too much work, as this will destroy the enjoyment of developing your game. Your mind needs to be fresh and creative! Finally, focus on small but exciting and interesting game mechanics, experiment, and don’t worry too much about your game’s income. It’s likely that your first game won’t be a super-hit if we talk about revenue, but it will be a super-big win in your learning process!

Of course, when you are ready to publish your game, be confident that it is fully playable and contains no critical bugs players will experience. This is very important, as you won’t get another window with such visibility on your game as its launch. Your game launch is unique and important, so you want to exploit the opportunities that come with that moment to the max. Again, keeping your first project small will help you focus on fixing and polishing everything. Remember, negative reviews are always the first to come! Do not let this get you down, but learn from negative constructive feedback, recognize any mistakes, and improve!

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What is IK Interactive up to next?

We are actually starting to prototype a kind of 3D platformer inspired by the series of Crash Bandicoot games on PlayStation, which I really loved when I was younger. At the moment, it’s too early to talk too much about it as we are just setting down the ideas and working out concepts, but we will be delighted to share more info as soon as the way ahead becomes clear!

 Cheers and good luck, Luca!

Head to Steam to check out Room 54, and stay tuned for more updates on what Luca and IK Interactive are up to next!

Are you’re making something cool with CRYENGINE? Let us know in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Pick up tips and tricks about our engine, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/achieved-with-cryengine-indie-horror-room-54-is-out-now Thu, 17 Jun 2021 15:59:13 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Master Class: Particle Effects Part 3]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-master-class-particle-effects-part-3

Watch the third part of our three-episode particle effects Master Class, hosted by Senior VFX Artist Viktor Ikkes. This must-watch Master Class takes you on an in-depth tour of CRYENGINE's tools and uses the Game SDK Sample Project as a learning aid, which you can download for free from The CRYENGINE Marketplace. New to the series? Catch up with part 1 and part 2.

In this episode, Viktor presents advanced particle design techniques. You'll learn how to define surface types and create material effects, ensuring that collisions between any two material types produce the desired reactions. Those reactions include generating particle effects, spawning decals, playing audio cues, and responses that produce the correct friction and elasticity, damage accumulation, breakages and piercings, and more. Viktor also demonstrates how to expose particle properties to the sandbox editor using attributes, how to send particles between a source and target to create effects like lightning bolts, how to debug particle effects, and more.

This Master Class is aimed at those of you with some experience with game development and CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to our engine, we recommend that you download our beginner's course, which shows you how to make a complete game with CRYENGINE or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

]]>
https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-master-class-particle-effects-part-3 Tue, 15 Jun 2021 16:00:39 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[The Drained Goddess Interview]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/the-drained-goddess-interview

Out now in Early Access on Steam, The Drained Goddess invites you to find clues, solve puzzles, and discover nightmarish secrets in a tense indie horror adventure with multiple endings. As you unravel the dark mysteries of a mountain village, you’ll be confronted by supernatural enemies in your quest to expel the evil and understand the unfolding terrors around you. Developed by Carpelock, founded by Zhen Wang, The Drained Goddess is a fantastic showcase for what a one-person development team can achieve with CRYENGINE. We caught up with Zhen, an active member of our friendly and welcoming CRYENGINE community, to find out more. 

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Hey Zhen! So, how did you get started with CRYENGINE?

I tried the most popular engine options out for months when I decided to make the game. In the end, I chose CRYENGINE because it provides a mature and reliable solution for any serious project. Although The Drained Goddess is not based on the CRYENGINE GameSDK, the GameSDK acted as an excellent example for a fully-featured game. Some engines only provide limited-size samples, which has shortcomings. When I want to implement new features, but I’m not sure how to achieve them, I can always find examples in the GameSDK.

All the CRYENGINE source code is available on Github with commit history, which guarantees that the development can always proceed independently from official engine updates. It is crucial for unique game design as I often modify things here and there for any special requirements.

What inspired you to create The Drained Goddess?

The Drained Goddess is a projection of some of the nightmares I have had and stories that I heard when I was a child, which I combined and expanded to create the story. It’s a supernatural horror game where evil entities infest a remote village. Players will have to discover secrets and solve clues to push the plot forward, decide whether to fight against the game’s many unique enemies, or sneak away after finding what they were looking for. I am proud of the story, but in terms of gameplay think my favorite moments are when you find clues that lead you to hidden enemies that suddenly reveal themselves. There are also some challenging decisions to make. For instance, you will have to decide whether you have enough health and resources to attack an enemy or whether you should flee and fight another day.

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What CRYENGINE features helped you during this production?

The programming of this game is based on the entity component system. With about 60K lines of game-side custom C++ code, the entity component system has proved to be reliable and able to communicate with other sub-systems in a very efficient way.

I was lucky that the official CRYENGINE Discord channel was established when I started diving deep into CRYENGINE. So many Crytekers and developers in the channel helped me and showed a lot of patience too! It would be impossible for me to achieve The Drained Goddess without their help.

Now you have launched in Early Access, what are your next steps for The Drained Goddess?

First, several more unique enemies are on their way. Like most enemies in this game, they might only appear after players discover certain secrets. Combat scenes for these new enemies will also be refactored or improved. Then I will focus on developing new chapters, so more secrets and unique enemies will come along until the story is completed. At the same time as developing new content, the current art, audio, puzzles, and AI behaviors will also be improved and updated.

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Have you got any advice for other indie developers?

The most valuable thing that I learned from the development experience of The Drained Goddess so far is that one can always do so much more than you initially thought. I was not sure if I could achieve and release a serious game project, without even considering its quality bar, three years ago. But now, when I look back, most of the features I considered as ‘very risky’ in my original design have already been implemented in the game!

Thanks, Zhen!

Head to Steam to learn more about The Drained Goddess and play it in Early Access.

If you’re making something cool with CRYENGINE, let us know in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Pick up tips and tricks about our engine, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/the-drained-goddess-interview Thu, 10 Jun 2021 16:00:07 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE Summer Academy Episode 3 is here!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-3-is-here

Watch the latest installment of our CRYENGINE Summer Academy, a fifteen-part series aimed at both newcomers to CRYENGINE and those with an intermediate level of experience, showing you the fundamentals of game development for all kinds of projects. The series uses Breeze, a prototype platforming game featuring a beautiful, stylized island, as a learning aid. Hosted by Junior Evangelist Roman Perezogin, today's episode focuses on procedural level design using CRYENGINE's Vegetation and Terrain tools.

In episode 3, Roman walks you through the process of creating an island with different areas, starting from a blank level. First, Roman uses the Terrain Editor to generate and manipulate terrain to create the size, shape, and form of an island. Roman then shows you how to use layers to create different biomes with the Terrain Editor. You'll also learn how to use the Vegetation Editor to create meshes, set the density and distribution of your vegetation, and even regulate how the grass will sway in the wind. By the end of the tutorial, you will have created an entire island with distinct and charming diversity, from the beach to the forest and the mountains, using workflows and principles that you can apply to more complex projects.

New to the series? Catch up here:

Episode 1: Course introduction, plus basic game dev techniques, including making a character move.

Episode 2: Use the Cry Designer tool to quickly prototype levels and game mechanics.

In addition to hosting CRYENGINE Summer Academy episodes, our YouTube channel is home to a wide range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Pick up tips and tricks, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. You can leave us feedback about our engine and get social in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

We're always looking for new team members. At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-summer-academy-episode-3-is-here Wed, 09 Jun 2021 16:00:17 +0200 Crytek
<![CDATA[Sniper Ghost Warrior Contracts 2 is out now!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/sniper-ghost-warrior-contracts-2-is-out-now

Plan your attack, equip authentic gadgets and equipment, take down targets from over 1 kilometer away, and bring down a brutal dictatorship as Sniper Ghost Warrior Contracts 2 launches today for PS4, Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, and PC. Powered by CRYENGINE, Sniper Ghost Warrior Contracts 2 takes you to Kuamar, a lawless fictional region of the Middle East located along the Lebanese and Syrian borders. You’ll play the role of Raven, a Contract Sniper Assassin, as you fight through five vast, distinct, and diverse sandbox levels built for replayability. Experience high-pressure tactical combat, deep inside enemy territory, in the most challenging and authentic entry in the series yet.

Discover more about the game, find out how the team has evolved the franchise, and learn how CRYENGINE helped them achieve their vision in our interview with Krzysztof Golatowski, Lead Producer at CI Games.

Hey Krzysztof! Congratulations on the launch! Can you tell us about the setting for Sniper Ghost Warrior Contracts 2?

Contracts 2 tells the story of a fictional Middle Eastern regime gone bad. The President of Kuamar has been murdered, and his wife, Bibi Rashida, has taken control. Unfortunately, she faces many internal threats and has bolstered her support with the aid of some very dangerous people. Now her regime is threatening neighboring states, and it’s time for Raven to intervene in his own unique way! 

Players will explore a mix of punishing deserts, lush oasis outposts, and even dense forest, which thrives on the mountain’s microclimate. 

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What are your favorite new features in Contracts 2? 

For the first time in the Sniper Ghost Warrior series, we have introduced extreme-range sniping sections. The large, open maps players loved in the first Contracts are returning, but now we also have some maps focused more on the long shot scenarios with a number of challenges and ways to achieve mission goals. 

The dev team spent a lot of time reading comments and reviews for Contracts 1, and a system that we thought we needed to take to another level was the game’s difficulty level. The new approach to difficulty ensures that even casual players will have a lot of fun with the game. At the same time, the "Dead Eye" mode - the most difficult one - will set a new level of challenge for even the most experienced players.

Players can look forward to many positive changes to the weapon ballistics, weapon mechanics, the save system, AI behaviors, mission construction, and much more. The long shot contracts are probably my favorite new feature, but there are plenty of other features which were also redesigned and improved. 

How does the 1 km distance for sniping change the design of the game and the player experience? 

The 1 km sniping shots are one of the greatest features in the game, but it was also one of the most challenging things to achieve without losing the visual quality. Try to imagine; the engine has to render objects that are really far away from the player position, and players can quickly aim to that distance. As a result, we had to spend a lot of time thinking about our approach to building maps, optimizing assets, and modifying existing systems that would not lose visual quality during these scenarios. 

Our designers also didn’t have an easy job while building the maps; they had to make sure that all the key elements for gameplay would be visible from the right angle, and they had to come up with a lot of scenarios that allowed players to feel that each shot had affected distant enemies.

The programming team prepared the systems, artists created great graphics, designers planned enjoyable missions, and our brave QA department played through every single element of the complicated maps and contracts. 

The result of all this hard work means that Contracts 2 introduces very different gameplay experiences, such as the extreme-range sniping scenarios, which we can’t wait to see players get their hands on.

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What technical and visual improvements can fans look out for?  

We spent a lot of time creating assets to the highest standard of quality. A good example of this is that we use technology for scanning real people and clothing when it comes to making our in-game characters. 

We also improved our in-game textures. For example, we use Megascans Textures for a lot of objects and terrain assets. Also, we further developed a system called “Array Textures,” which allows us to use higher texture resolutions without additional memory usage and game performance overheads.

Overall, we’ve updated all environments and characters using scan data to the highest possible quality to achieve even greater realism.

How has CRYENGINE helped the team achieve its vision for the game?

CRYENGINE has been a wonderful tool to allow us to achieve the incredible visual fidelity of the Contracts series. We’ve had a lot of feedback praising the graphics in the new Contracts game, and CRYENGINE has been a really important partner in allowing us to reach those visual heights.

Cheers, Krzysztof!

Set your sights on https://www.sniperghostwarriorcontracts2.com to learn more about the game.

What are you most looking forward to in Contracts 2? Let us know in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Pick up tips and tricks about our engine, ask questions, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.

If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we host a range of content, including tutorials covering all aspects of the engine and game design. Want to show your love for CRYENGINE? Pick up merch over on the official online Crytek Store.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/sniper-ghost-warrior-contracts-2-is-out-now Fri, 04 Jun 2021 16:56:58 +0200 Crytek