CRYENGINE | The complete solution for next generation game development by Crytek https://www.cryengine.com/ The most powerful game development platform for you and your team to create world-class entertainment experiences. en-US Copyright 2020, Crytek GmbH. Fri, 21 Feb 2020 16:00:26 +0100 Sun, 23 Feb 2020 06:37:47 +0100 60 <![CDATA[Art Asset Pipeline: Collision Proxies Part 2]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-collision-proxies-part-2

In the second part of our latest Master Class tutorial series, Alin Alexa, one of our Technical Support Specialists, takes you step-by-step through a proven-in-production art asset pipeline using Autodesk Maya. This video demonstrates how to set up the CryMaya tools and how to create physical collision proxies in Autodesk Maya using a CryTools pipeline, in addition to an FBX pipeline. The tutorial also includes a basic explanation of Maya’s material and shader functionality, with regards to Maya’s Hypershade function, in comparison to CRYENGINE’s material system.

A collision proxy is a geometric model that is used for calculations in the physics module of CRYENGINE. This includes physical collisions, friction, and physical raycasts to name just a few. They also provide the opportunity to simplify the physical model compared to the rendered mesh to optimize for performance. By the end of the tutorial, you will be able to Use Autodesk Maya to create physical collision proxies, which you can import into CRYENGINE using your favored workflow.

Further information about setting up assets and exporting them from Maya into CRYENGINE can be found in our written documentation. If you want to learn how to create physical collision proxies using a 3DS Max workflow, check out the first tutorial in this series.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for more tutorials, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-collision-proxies-part-2 Fri, 21 Feb 2020 16:00:26 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Puzzle game Ramiwo releases today]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/puzzle-game-ramiwo-releases-today

Ramiwo is a stylish indie game created by a small team that you can play on Steam today. The game was created as a side project, and we spoke to Tom Deerberg, Environment Artist at Crytek, about what players can expect and how the team used CRYENGINE to create their indie game quickly.

Hey Tom, thanks for joining us. What was the inspiration behind this project?

The idea was born after some speed modeling exercises. One evening, I modeled a scenario from one photo, similar to these. It was all very rough and dirty, but it captured a mood quite nicely. After doing around 25 of them, I got bored and started to remix the sets, mixing a city with a barn, a jungle with a harbor, industrial sites with a forest landscape, and much more. After another 25 remixed settings, I decided to try some more extreme things, like using vertex deformation and texture oscillators. I was trying out things we don’t normally do very much during regular production at Crytek.

It was around this time that the idea came about to make more than just another Artstation post. How could we make something for players? I asked a colleague to help me prototype a version of an endless cube, with environments connected through gates with four per environment, represented on a cube that serves as a map.

What will players experience when they play Ramiwo?

The player will see a lot of different environments in a very fast rhythm, with environments ranging from the realistic to the surreal. The player must study the map to understand where they are, and then read the environment to work out how to get to the next new area. Players may get a little lost at times, but that’s part of the puzzle!

You’ve worked on several of our AAA productions. What was the biggest difference in development when it came to creating Ramiwo?

The biggest difference was to think small! It’s not about applying all of the learned knowledge from a regular AAA production, but working with what is available. I wanted to choose a short time frame, scope, and keep the game assets simple.

Which CRYENGINE features helped you with this project?

We used the engine’s basic tools because we wanted to keep the scope small. The environment editor helped us create a wide range of different lighting, and the cube map baker helped us quickly create ‘cheap’ reflections and ambient light. We used Flowgraph to build the logic for teleporting from world-to-world and used a visual script to build a simple first person setup. The compile function allowed us to package the final build.

What advice would you give to developers who want to create a short game like this?

Stay small in scope, rethink ideas, and cut as many ideas as possible if you are working alone or as part of a very small team. We had many more ideas, but we decided to keep everything small and simple. But most of all, just give it a try if you are interested as it’s a really exciting process.

Cheers, Tom!

Check out Ramiwo on Steam now. If you do decide to try it, be sure to let them know how you liked the game.

Are you working on an indie game? Let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/puzzle-game-ramiwo-releases-today Wed, 19 Feb 2020 16:00:58 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Hunt: Showdown out now on PlayStation® 4 and Microsoft Xbox®]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-showdown-out-now-on-playstation-r-4-and-microsoft-xbox-r

Crytek and Koch Media happily announce that the highly acclaimed online multi-player bounty hunting game Hunt: Showdown is now available physically and digitally for PlayStation®4 and physically for Microsoft Xbox®.

About Hunt: Showdown

Hunt: Showdown is a competitive first-person bounty hunting game that packs the thrill of survival games into a match-based format. Set in Louisiana in 1895, the game boasts a mixture of PvP and PvE elements that creates a uniquely tense experience. It’s not just the creatures who are a threat—it’s every Hunter on the map. In the classic game mode, a match of Hunt pits ten players—playing solo or in teams of two—against each other as they race to take out gruesome beasts for a bounty they must collect and get off of the map, while Hunt’s quickplay mode offers a shorter match for solo players to scavenge for weapons as they compete for a diminishing pool of bounty. The higher the risk, the higher the reward–but a single mistake could cost everything.

About Koch Media

Koch Media is a leading producer and distributor of digital entertainment products (games, films and software). The company's own publishing activities, marketing and distribution extend throughout Europe, North America and Australia. The Koch Media group has more than 25 years of experience in the digital media business, and has risen to become the number one publishing partner in Europe. It has also formed strategic alliances with numerous games and software publishers: Bethesda, Capcom, Codemasters, Kaspersky Labs, Konami, Koei Tecmo, Milestone, Sega, Square Enix, etc. in various European countries. With Headquarter in Höfen, Austria Koch Media owns branches in Germany, England, France, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, the Nordic regions, Benelux, Australia, Czech Republic, Poland, and the United States.

All product titles, publisher names, trademarks, artwork and associated imagery are trademarks, registered trademarks and/or copyright material of the respective owners. All rights reserved.

About Crytek

Crytek is an independent videogame developer, publisher, and technology provider dedicated to pushing the boundaries of gaming with its cutting-edge 3D game development solution CRYENGINE. With headquarters in Frankfurt am Main (Germany) and studios in Kiev (Ukraine), and Istanbul (Turkey), Crytek has created multiple award-winning titles, including the original Far Cry, the Crysis series, Ryse: Son of Rome, Warface, The Climb, Robinson: The Journey and Hunt: Showdown. Crytek delivers fun and innovative gaming experiences for PC, consoles, and VR and continues to grow its reach in the games-as-a-service market. Every Crytek game is created with CRYENGINE, which can be used by anyone to create games.

For more information visit www.crytek.com and www.cryengine.com.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-showdown-out-now-on-playstation-r-4-and-microsoft-xbox-r Tue, 18 Feb 2020 12:42:36 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Hunt: The Firefighters of New Orleans]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-the-firefighters-of-new-orleans

We've been devastated to see the destruction being caused by the fires in Australia. As headline after headline made its way to our headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany, we decided we would take action. So we have created a special DLC bundle, themed around New Orleans fire fighters of the 1890s. Proceeds from this bundle will go toward the ongoing fire relief efforts for its first two months on sale.

For this benefit, we will be partnering with Wires, Australia's largest wildlife rescue organization. For over 30 years, their mission has been to rehabilitate and preserve Australia wildlife, and to inspire and educate others to do the same. As they say of the current situation on their website: “Summer is a frantically busy time for wildlife rescue and there are still over 100 fires burning in NSW. In December alone there were over 20,000 calls to WIRES 1300 line, a 14% increase on last year, and volunteers attended over 3,300 rescues."

So, until March 31st, 2020, all of the proceeds from the Fire Fight bundle will go toward supporting their efforts. After that, the items will still be available as usual. A note: the charity benefit event will be for PC-only, though of course Xbox and PlayStation players will also get access to the Fire Fight items in March.

Skip the details, and buy it now.

The Fire Fight Bundle contains two new Hunt weapons – a heavy knife and a Sparks LRR – dedicated to fire fighters everywhere. The New Orleans Fire Department began in April of 1829, when a group of men organized a volunteer fire department called the Fireman's Charitable Association. After 62 years of volunteer service, the New Orleans Fire Department became a paid fire-fighting force in 1891 – just four years before the main action of Hunt takes place.

In October of 1895, a fire that started in a tenement building took out most of the New Orleans West Bank neighborhood of Algiers. Horse drawn fire trucks arrived to fight the blaze, but they were unable to stop the fire's spread. In memory of these historic fire fights, and with our hats raised to the fire fighters working tirelessly across Australia even now, we dedicate these two new items.

Algiers Phoenix

Christened by the New Orleans Fire Department, the Algiers Phoenix helped several victims “rise from the ashes" when it freed them from the flames devouring the Algiers neighborhood. A heavy knife handy both in an emergency, and in the field.

Fire Torn

Charred but not destroyed, this Sparks LRR is not a testament to the destructive power of fire, but to the resilience of that which withstands it. A symbol of hope for rejuvenation.

***

So grab a copy of the bundle in the next months, and contribute to a good cause while filling out your Hunt gear collection. If you want to find out more about what else we released in our 1.2 Update, check out the 1.2 Update Highlight Video right over here.

With a Hunt server in Oceania, a shout out to all our players in the region! We hope you're all safe. <3

Donate to a good cause! Buy the Fire Fight bundle now.

Don't own Hunt yet? Get a copy for PC on Steam or in the Crytek store, or for Xbox in the Microsoft Store! Hunt launches for PS4 on February 18, 2020.

Still have questions? Stop by the Hunt: Showdown social media channels and let us know:

Discord + XboxClub + Facebook + Twitter + Instagram + Xbox + Steam

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/hunt-the-firefighters-of-new-orleans Wed, 19 Feb 2020 19:23:47 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem is Out Now]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/wolcen-lords-of-mayhem-is-out-now

Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem moves out of Steam Early Access and receives its full release for PC today. Achieved with CRYENGINE, the beautiful action RPG game from Wolcen Studio, based in Nice, France, invites players to shape-shift into a customized apocalyptic avatar of destruction as they embark on an epic adventure. Crytek congratulates everyone at Wolcen Studio on the launch.

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Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem features an immersive story with deep lore as players explore a shattered and corrupted world to uncover ancient secrets and hidden truths. Gameplay revolves around fast-paced, dynamic combat, enabling gamers to dodge, dash, and hack and slash through enemies. Players can deploy a range of devastating spells, defend themselves with an asymmetric armor system, and take advantage of a large armory of weapons. Gamers can customize their character to their preferred playing style and level-up however they choose, with the freedom to play without class restrictions.

Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem presents a beautiful, dangerous, and mysterious world of witchcraft, ancient cults, and warmongers for players to conquer alone or cooperatively in online multiplayer. The game’s deep focus on customization and modifiers allows players to develop their character with unique and deadly skills as they collect loot, unravel mysteries, and take on hordes of opponents. Gamers can experience the gripping gameplay, merciless enemies, and incredible graphics featured in Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem by buying the game from Steam.

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Discover more about Wolcen: Lords of Mayhem by visiting https://wolcengame.com/

Are you picking up Wolcen? Let us know your thoughts on this stunning game on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Don’t forget to join our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in our engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/wolcen-lords-of-mayhem-is-out-now Thu, 13 Feb 2020 17:59:10 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Bringing The Climb to Oculus Quest]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/bringing-the-climb-to-oculus-quest

Our award-winning VR rock climbing game, The Climb, launched on Oculus Quest in December of last year. The game invites players to experience the adrenaline rush of extreme free solo rock climbing as they ascend to epic heights, explore caves, and find shortcuts. Its arrival on the wireless Oculus Quest adds a new dimension to the gameplay experience, and the game is an amazing example of what CRYENGINE can achieve on a mobile chipset. We sat down with Hussein Dari, Lead Level Designer, Sebastien Laurent, Technical Director, Theodor Mader, Lead Rendering Engineer, and Fatih Özbayram, Lead Producer to find out about the development and design process.

Hey guys, thanks for joining us. How pleased are you with how The Climb plays on Oculus Quest?

Fatih: Our goal was to compromise as little as possible to ensure the same immersive and awe-inspiring experience on Quest, and I think it is fair to say this was achieved!

Theo: I really love how natural the climbing feels and how scary the heights are. And of course the impressive vistas! The Oculus Quest version is a step forward for this experience, with more freedom of movement and none of the restrictions of cables.

Hussein: Our aim was not just to port The Climb to the Quest, but also to deliver an experience as faithful as possible to the original game. The Climb runs great and still looks very good on the new device, and that’s without changing any of the gameplay or level layouts.

Sebastien: I think it's really humbling to see what our team has achieved here. The game is visually stunning and plays beautifully. The reviews we get from the players show how impressive an achievement this is. Regarding the gameplay, one of the main differences when comparing the Quest version to the Rift and Touch combination is that the controllers can easily end up outside of the Quest's sensor range. Due to the nature of our gameplay, this situation happens often, so we had to handle that case as gracefully as possible, and I think the result is very satisfying.

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How does going wireless change the experience?

Fatih: One of the most significant changes that the Quest introduces is that players can stand up and move freely as there are no cables to manage. While we had to optimize the game to fit into memory constraints and to meet the target fps to create a smooth experience, the rock climbing experience feels as immersive on Quest as it does on Rift.

Hussein: It makes climbing more fun as you aren’t limited by the distance of the cable to your PC. You can climb wherever you are. We had a lot of cases in the studio where somebody just carried their device over and showed you something cool that they discovered. Moving to the Oculus Quest also gave us some really positive things. For instance, we don’t need to “rotate” the player body while you are climbing as much as in the original game, and, as in the original, climbing with Motion Controllers is way more fun and realistic.

What were the challenges of bringing The Climb to less powerful hardware, but still ensuring an awesome experience?

Sebastien: There was a large amount of work to be done, and I want to thank our Systems team here, for they had to make sure the engine runs properly on ARM CPUs, make our first Linux-based client application (the OS on the Oculus Quest is based on Android), and they had to solve a bunch of new problems that are specific to mobile platforms such as thermal throttling and battery consumption. There was also a shared effort to make The Climb fit into the very tight memory constraints of the Oculus Quest. Even though our Systems and Rendering teams did a wonderful job making our systems more compact and eliminating overhead, we also needed to re-think our approach to building levels in The Climb to make them fit, as our initial approach was more focused on reducing loading times. The other aspect that I would like to mention is much less visible to the outside world, but still an important one. Our whole pipeline had to factor in the new platform so we needed to streamline our workflows such that our programmers and content creators were as efficient as possible. That included features from project generation to build packaging, including, of course, deployment to the device.

Theo: Porting a PC game to a portable, battery-powered device like the Oculus Quest is a challenge. Not only are key characteristics like memory bandwidth and numerical computation speed significantly different to PC, but also new constraints come into play. For instance, the battery drain needs constant supervision, and without external cooling, the devices can heat up quickly if pushed too hard. The GPU architecture is also significantly different from mainstream PC GPUs, requiring customized solutions to get the best performance. It was a learning process for us, but in the end, it helped us to optimize both CRYENGINE and the CRYENGINE renderer to a whole new level.

Hussein: Many people didn’t notice that in the original version of The Climb, all the levels were part of one big level. We chose this approach because, at the very beginning of the project, we had technical difficulties in rendering loading screens. Later during production, we were able to get loading screens in, but by then, it was too late to separate the levels. We used the loading screens to make the level transitions smoother and hide render artifacts.In one of our early tests, we noticed that the original big map wouldn’t run on the Oculus Quest. So we decided to separate one of the levels out and see if the Quest could run it. After the test was successful, we knew that we had to split all 15 levels into single levels. As we used one big level before, all the level and code logic that was designed and optimized needed to be rewritten to handle cases where information has to carry from one level to another.

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How pleased are you with the performance of CRYENGINE on this chipset?

Sebastien: The Climb definitely proved that even though CRYENGINE has always been renowned for pushing the boundaries on high end machines, it can scale down to more modest hardware and shine. Now that we've paved the way, we're excited to bring all of these learnings and improvements to our community and licensees in the future and see what they come up with. This work will definitely open up a lot of new doors and opportunities for people working with CRYENGINE.

Theo: We have learnt a lot about this specific chipset during the development of The Climb Quest port, and this directly reflects in the performance of CRYENGINE on the Quest device. There are, of course, always further improvements to be made, but I believe we have nailed the most important ones while porting this game.  We are quite pleased with the outcome.Mobile, in general, is a very hot topic for CRYENGINE at the moment and while I can't give any details right now, I can tell you that we have some very cool things to look forward to.

How did CRYENGINE help you achieve your vision?

Theo: We decided from the start to build the rendering pipeline based on the Vulkan Graphics API. Vulkan gives developers much finer control over the device than OpenGL, enabling us to squeeze every last bit of performance from the hardware. Another advantage of CRYENGINE is the strong implementation of physically based shading. It lets artists recreate almost any surface from the real world, and the faithful light-material interactions greatly help the immersion of the players in the game.

Hussein: The new version of the engine has lots of new features and optimizations, which made it easier to reach our goal. One of the cool new features is better Python support. It was very easy for us level designers to create small scripts which helped us to automate lots of processes. As mentioned, we now had 15 separate levels, and some changes had to be merged to each, sometimes with small alterations. This was solved very quickly with scripts.

Sebastien: CRYENGINE is, at its core, a cross-platform engine, and as such most systems are extendable. This was a huge help when developing a game for a new device and platform.

What do you think was the biggest achievement for the team?

Sebastien: This project involved a lot of new challenges for us. We had a new hardware platform, new operating system, new CPU architecture, new GPU architecture, new input devices, new tools, well, you get the picture. We also pushed the Vulkan mobile pipeline both for our engine and for the platform, which led to some improvements on their tools and drivers. All in all, I think that the biggest achievement was managing to release such a high quality product when facing so many unknowns.

Theo: When we started working on the project, we were not sure how much of the visual fidelity, we would be able to preserve on the Oculus Quest device. The screen resolution and the high frame rate were difficult targets to hit, and it required a lot of brainstorming and out-of-the-box thinking to come up with solutions. But in the end, we managed to bring the core visual experience and the core gameplay experience to the device.

Hussein: At Crytek, we’re known for shipping games that look amazing. We could have made our lives way easier by just reducing the quality of the game and porting it over. But our biggest achievement was to ensure the game still looks amazing and plays amazing, all while reaching the target fps.

Cheers, guys!

As ever, we look forward to your feedback in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/bringing-the-climb-to-oculus-quest Tue, 18 Feb 2020 16:57:21 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Meet the Team: Roman Perezogin, Junior Technical Designer]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-roman-perezogin-junior-technical-designer

Roman Perezogin moved from being part of the CRYENGINE community to working with our engine every day to serve the CRYENGINE community. Roman is one of our tutorial hosts, and in today’s interview, we learn about his journey and how his experience of being part of the community helps him in his current role as Junior Technical Designer.

Hey Roman! Can you tell us a bit about your background and your history with CRYENGINE?

Hey! Well, I am from Germany, and now living here in Frankfurt. I started out as a graphic designer, but it turned out the job was not a good fit for me. Since I loved playing games, I kind of wanted to create my own worlds and my own stories. So I started to learn a few things about game development. I began with Unreal in my first steps with game development but I couldn't get my head around it. So I tried other engines and when I discovered CRYENGINE, I immediately felt like home because I was able to understand the basics of the engine really quickly. This was about five or six years ago.

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How did you get to join Crytek and get into your current role?

I was working on my solo project, an open world horror game with CRYENGINE and I received huge support from Crytek and the community team. I was invited to the studio, they took me with them to conventions, so I was able to present my game, and it was amazing! However, I actually grew tired of developing a game on my own for almost four years. I wanted to join the people I loved to work with and who supported me, so when I got the opportunity to join Crytek, I jumped at it. Shout out to Gabriel here!

What is your main focus at the moment?

To be honest, I want to work out my Grandma’s amazing vanilla cake recipe! It’s been bugging me for months now, and she won’t tell me her secret. But besides that, my main focus is to develop myself and learn as much as I can. Even though I had built up great experience working with CRYENGINE as an indie developer, a AAA workflow is quite different. Not only that but with so many amazingly talented people around the studio, you just want to suck up as much of their wisdom as possible. So you try to learn all the amazing and interesting things you can and try to adapt. I love it. There is always, always something new to learn every day at Crytek, and then I get to use the knowledge to improve the quality of the experience for people using our engine.

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How does it feel to make the switch from being part of the community to working on CRYENGINE for the community?

Joining Crytek was really enlightening. With the experience of an indie dev and no background in AAA game development, it was only when I joined Crytek that I actually learned what all the really complex systems “behind the curtain” actually do. The experience of working with CRYENGINE previously gave me the perspective of an indie dev and a connection to the community. It's helping me to target the needs of our community and use that knowledge to guide the future of tutorials and improvements for the engine.

What’s been your most satisfying moment working with CRYENGINE at Crytek?

That's a tough question! There are a lot of great moments, but getting to interact with our community at all the different conferences is something I really enjoy.

How does a regular day at work look like for you?

To begin with, it involves a lot of coffee! Then checking my mails and our official discord channel, which you should definitely join, and then getting to work, opening a new build of the engine, and thinking about more coffee while the engine starts up. And then I get to work, develop amazing stuff, learn and create!

What does it take to do your job well?

Passion and commitment. You have to be ready to absorb a lot of knowledge from the incredibly talented artists and programmers here and understand what they are trying to teach you, and then use that knowledge to create something great. I think it takes a fascination for the industry too. My passion is all about breathtaking technology and its possibilities, and to learn from the amazing minds here. You need to be committed to learning, then covert that knowledge into skill, and then convey that knowledge to the community.

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Have you got any tips for anyone aspiring to work in your field?

To quote a phrase, just do it! One of the most important tips I have, though, is to really understand what you are doing. Understand what you are trying to achieve. Learn about the basics and the foundations of your task. You want to create animations and play them in the engine, for example? Then learn and understand what animations are and what they do, the low level basics, and take baby steps. Understand how the engine handles animations, and what happens in the background. This will give you amazing analytical skills, and you will be able to debug whatever troubles you encounter.

What are you most looking forward to coming to the engine?

Visual Scripting, of course. I absolutely love working with our new visual scripting tool.

What are you playing at the moment?

Breath of the Wild, which is an amazing and relaxing game. I also play a lot of party games with friends. I’m really looking forward to Cyberpunk 2077 and, of course, loving our very own Hunt: Showdown.

Cheers, Roman!

Join Roman over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. Our team is always collating your feedback on our channels, so if you have suggestions about the engine or future tutorials, do let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Would you like to follow Roman’s path from the community to working on our team? We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-roman-perezogin-junior-technical-designer Fri, 07 Feb 2020 16:18:10 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Art Asset Pipeline Tutorial]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-tutorial

In a new Master Class tutorial series, Alin Alexa, one of our Technical Support Specialists, takes you step-by-step through a proven-in-production art asset pipeline. The first video in this series demonstrates how to create physical collision proxies for your assets in 3DS Max, and then get them into the engine using the CryExporter tools, in this case focusing on the CryMax plugin. The same process is also shown using an FBX pipeline so you can pick your favored workflow.

A collision proxy is a geometric model that is used for calculations in the physics module of CRYENGINE. This includes physical collisions, friction and physical raycasts to name just a few. They also provide the opportunity to simplify the physical model compared to the rendered mesh to optimize for performance. The tutorial explains the purpose and principles behind these physical proxies, as well as a practical walkthrough of both the CryTools and FBX pipelines, in just under 15 minutes

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

Stay tuned to our usual channels for the next tutorial in this series, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/art-asset-pipeline-tutorial Wed, 05 Feb 2020 16:00:43 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[New character attachments tutorial]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/new-character-attachments-tutorial

In our latest Master Class, Roman Perezogin, one of our Junior Technical Designers, takes you step-by-step through the process of using the attachment system in CRYENGINE’s character tool. In just over ten minutes, you’ll be shown a practical workflow that you can follow along with and apply to your own projects.

The tutorial follows on from Roman’s previous tutorial in which he demonstrates how to create a character and import it into CRYENGINE by using Character Creator 3 and iClone 7. If you wish to follow along with this new video, and you do not already have a character with animations and a generated character definition file in your project, we recommend that you watch that tutorial first.

This new video demonstrates how the character pipeline uses an attachment system to customize the appearance of a character model in a variety of ways. This allows you to apply different skins and accessories to characters so you can create unique looks. In this tutorial, Roman looks at the skin and joint attachments, and other attachment types will be covered in a future tutorial. 

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using CRYENGINE. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel. 

We hope you find this tutorial useful. If you’re looking for more tutorials, don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/new-character-attachments-tutorial Thu, 30 Jan 2020 16:01:57 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Get set for Global Game Jam 2020!]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/get-set-for-global-game-jam-2020

Global Game Jam 2020 is the world’s largest game jam. People from all backgrounds and with different levels of experience come together to develop games in just 48 hours, based on a theme only revealed when the event begins. Global Game Jam 2020 begins on January 31, and you can find out how to join thousands of developers across the globe entering the event by visiting https://globalgamejam.org/. Find a game jam near you and sign up!

A game jam is all about creating and iterating quickly, so CRYENGINE is, of course, ideal for anyone thinking about entering. Crytek entered four teams last year, and you can check out those games, learn about how they were created, and find out about the experience of team members who took part in a series of articles below:

Homebound

Available for you to download from the CRYENGINE Marketplace, check out Homebound, a game where you have to make your way home from a tavern on a stormy night. A crew of six people created the game in just 48 hours. Find out how the team set about the task and pick up some hints and tips for creating games quickly in our case study.

Haven

Haven invites you to explore a beautiful skyscape. Find out more in our interview with the team.

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Escape Home

Play the role of a blind teenager in stealth game Escape Home. Learn more in our Q&A.

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Get out and Play

Become a child who must help their mother and explore a charming island in Get out and Play. Read all about it in our blog with insights from the team.

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Top Tips from our team members who took part last year:

“Build a working prototype as quickly as possible. It doesn’t matter if the prototype looks good, just have a base and then expand your idea, instead of doing everything at once.” – Lukas Keil, Junior Audio Designer

“From the very beginning, keep the scope small. I would also recommend setting several small milestones, such as creating a moving player, which will help keep everyone motivated.” – Joshua Nuttall, Junior Software Engineer.

“It’s better to start with a small scope. You should build one core feature for the game, which feels good and then add different elements to it. It’s better to have a small polished game than a big one with lots of features that aren’t finished or feel clunky.” – Manuel Härtl, Junior Programmer for Hunt: Showdown

Assets and Resources:

To help you get prepared, we’ve pulled together a few resources so you can hit the ground running when Global Game Jam 2020 kicks off.

If you’re taking part, sign up to our official Discord channel where our teams will be posting updates about their progress, and you can chat with fellow devs taking part in the challenge live. You can also join the official Global Game Jam Discord, and if Twitter is your thing, stay up to date and share your progress with the hashtag #CryJam.

Creating a game jam game is all about speed, scope, and iteration. A great place to start is checking out our Galaxysys Sample Project, which you can download for free from the CRYENGINE Marketplace, showing what you can achieve in a limited amount of time. You can read insights from members of the team who made the game in our interview.

We also have a huge range of asset packs which are available for free from the CRYENGINE Marketplace. We’ve picked out a few of our favorites which are worth downloading in advance, so you have drop-in-and-play props to get you going quickly:

Ryse Nature Pack

A collection of high quality plants and bushes as used in Ryse: Son of Rome.

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Wilderness Assets

A versatile package of trees and grass.

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Ryse World Building Assets

A great sample that you can mod for your Global Game Jam project.

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Rock Textures

A wide variety of fantastic rock textures.

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Building Blocks

Construction blocks and iron fencing, ideal for an urban, industrial, or building site scene.

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All these assets are game-ready, require no plugins, and will help you realize a range of different projects, so get downloading.

Tutorials and Documentation:

If you’re new to CRYENGINE, we recommend checking out the CRYENGINE GameSDK Sample Project, which shows you how to set up a level.

Video Tutorials:

We have a range of tutorials to help you with different aspects of game development with our engine. Our FlappyBoid tutorial is a great step-by-step guide to creating a complete game with CRYENGINE for beginners. You can also head to our YouTube channel to check out a wide range of tutorials, covering everything from creating animated characters, to using the Mannequin Editor to program animated characters, prepping to use C++ with CRYENGINE, and adding audio using Fmod Studio.

Written Documentation:

We also suggest bookmarking the official CRYENGINE documentation. A few pieces you may wish to check out before beginning the event include our Getting Started guide, our guide to the editor tools, the section on entities and components, the console and config file reference, and the technical documentation for programmers.

Global Game Jam is an amazing event, and we can’t wait to see what the CRYENGINE community creates!

Connect with the community over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel and stay tuned to everything CRYENGINE on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity. We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/get-set-for-global-game-jam-2020 Tue, 28 Jan 2020 16:40:00 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Meet the Team: Aleksei Vaniushkin, Community Coordinator for CRYENGINE]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-aleksei-vaniushkin-community-coordinator-for-cryengine

CRYENGINE is the output of a wide and diverse team working to make the engine the best it can be, every single day. Today, we’re talking with our Community Coordinator Aleksei, who we’re sure many of you will be familiar with from our various social channels, to discover what makes him tick, what his working day looks like, and how much he enjoys interacting with CryEngineers around the world.

Hey Aleksei! How did you get into your current role?

I actually came from a different industry, but I have a lifelong passion for videogames and how they are made. In fact, the whole culture of the industry! My previous work experience included organizing groups of people to work on short and medium term projects, which meant communicating with people from all over the world. 

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I joined Crytek and started in the engine QA department, where I learned every corner of the engine visible to the user. I have pushed every button you see in the Sandbox 100 times at least! The editor window feels like home to me, so I figured it would be great to bring all this knowledge to community support. Joining Crytek and getting to play a role in the company that made games that I played in my youth is a wonderful experience, surreal almost. It sounds like a fairytale, but it's just an example of how far a passion can carry you.

What is your main focus at the moment?

My main task is to be there when the community needs me. We are a very lucky team since our community is really dedicated and mature. Our channels are a safe environment for developers and everyone interested in using a 3D engine. And my current task is a very exciting one, mostly related to things that are not yet public. But I can't wait to tell you about it as soon as I can!

What’s been your most satisfying moment working at Crytek?

Helping out so many different users is an inspiring process. Everyone, regardless of their level of experience, is a developer, and everyone has a project that they care about. They all use a tool that we dedicate our days to. And in a sense, we take part in the development process, pointing out answers, resources, and solutions. That is immensely satisfying and every time I answer something or help someone, it feels really good. 

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What does a regular day at work look like for you?

Very much like being in an airplane cockpit. I've got many windows and tabs open on my screen, in every possible form of computer communication, as well as constant chats with developers and reading into CRYENGINE documentation. Incredible how much you can learn from devs. It’s absolutely mind-blowing how many different areas there are in which people spend their lives becoming a specialist.

What does it take to do your job well?

In a nutshell, the Community Coordinator is all about communication in different forms. We are all people working on one large project, each contributing in their own way. And outside the company, there are users, developers, companies, and gamers. So it's important for us to open a window into the development process, hear what the community has to say, and help the developers and community to articulate their concerns, interests, and wishes. And the people doing it - it's us! At a glance, it seems like I'm simply sitting in front of a trillion internet tabs on two screens, but in fact, I'm communicating to a dozen people, and a different dozen each day.

Have you got any tips for anyone aspiring to work in role?

Patience and humility. Also, you will read a lot!

What are you most looking forward to seeing come to the engine?

The best update is always the next one! When you spend so much time around people passionately working on implementing cool new things and the results are not always visible to a naked eye, it becomes a very exciting story. I basically root for every developer, each team, hoping that all their features will make it into the next version.

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What are you playing at the moment?

I am a fan of tiny games, a fan of the idea that anyone can put out there their ideas, thoughts, and passions in a small compressed form. It's an a very unique form of sharing. Making a game is usually a big effort, but there are other options these days. So my favorite game would certainly be Bitsy which is a mini game engine geared towards making short story-oriented two bit experiences: https://ledoux.itch.io/bitsy. And the next logical step up would be to make it 3D and with lifelike raytracing using proprietary visual scripting… who knows?!

Thanks, Aleksei!

Say hi to Aleksei if you haven’t already by joining our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. Our team is always collating your feedback on our channels, so if you have suggestions about the engine, do let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity. We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/meet-the-team-aleksei-vaniushkin-community-coordinator-for-cryengine Fri, 24 Jan 2020 16:00:36 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Future Plans for Hunt: Showdown]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/future-plans-for-hunt-showdown

Thursday, January 16, 2020 — Crytek name Koch Media Publisher of their online multi-player bounty hunting game for Xbox One and PS4, announce PS4 release date and upcoming content.

Frankfurt (Germany), January 16, 2020 – Hunt: Showdown is getting a new publisher! Today Crytek announced that Koch Media will act as Hunt: Showdown’s publisher on PlayStation® 4 and Xbox One moving forward. Koch Media is responsible for both the global retail and digital releases of the game on these platforms. The extended partnership follows Koch Media’s successful retail release of Hunt: Showdown for PC in 2019. Crytek will continue to develop Hunt: Showdown, and act as publisher for the PC version on Steam. The two companies will be working together closely to deliver the best possible gaming experience across all platforms.

Alongside this news, Crytek and Koch Media revealed that Hunt: Showdown will be available on PlayStation®4 on February 18 2020.

“With Koch handling the publishing side of things, our development team can put all of their focus on continuing to develop and optimize Hunt across platforms, together with our community,” said Crytek CEO Avni Yerli. “While we focus on development, Koch will apply their immense digital and retail publishing expertise to the title, supporting the game’s continued growth. We can’t wait to see what PlayStation players think of the game, and to continue to bring new content to all our players in the coming year.”

“Hunt: Showdown is a unique game, that all of us here at Koch Media who already supported the PC retail release have a lot of fun playing,” added Koch Media CEO, Dr. Klemens Kundratitz. “The feedback we see from the PC community and the high quality standards of the game underline our confidence in the global release on PS4 and Xbox.”

In the next year, players can expect even more content to be added to Hunt: Showdown via the regular updates that the game has delivered throughout its lifespan. Update 1.2 is slated to bring random teams of three, an advanced tutorial, new Legendary Hunters, and new equipment and weapons across the board. Players can also expect server-side performance improvements, client CPU performance fixes, and a number of other general bug fixes.

Looking beyond Update 1.2, Hunt: Showdown will see even bigger updates arriving, including cross-play between Xbox and PlayStation, a Solo PvE mode, live-events, outfit customization, and a new map.

About Hunt: Showdown

Hunt: Showdown is a competitive first-person bounty hunting game that packs the thrill of survival games into a match-based format. Set in Louisiana in 1895, the game boasts a mixture of PvP and PvE elements that creates a uniquely tense experience. It’s not just the creatures who are a threat—it’s every Hunter on the map. In the classic game mode, a match of Hunt pits 12 players—playing solo or in teams of two or teams of three —against each other as they race to take out gruesome beasts for a bounty they must collect and get off of the map, while Hunt’s quickplay mode offers a shorter match for solo players to scavenge for weapons as they compete for a diminishing pool of bounty. The higher the risk, the higher the reward–but a single mistake could cost everything. Hunt is available now on Steam. For more information, visit https://www.huntshowdown.com/.

About Crytek

Crytek is an independent videogame developer, publisher, and technology provider dedicated to pushing the boundaries of gaming with its cutting-edge 3D game development solution CRYENGINE. With headquarters in Frankfurt am Main (Germany) and studios in Kiev (Ukraine), and Istanbul (Turkey), Crytek has created multiple award-winning titles, including the original Far Cry, the Crysis series, Ryse: Son of Rome, Warface, The Climb, Robinson: The Journey and Hunt: Showdown. Crytek delivers fun and innovative gaming experiences for PC, consoles, and VR and continues to grow its reach in the games-as-a-service market. Every Crytek game is created with CRYENGINE, which can be used by anyone to create games.

For more information visit www.crytek.com and www.cryengine.com

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/future-plans-for-hunt-showdown Thu, 16 Jan 2020 18:05:16 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Creating Animated Characters using Character Creator 3 & iClone 7]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/creating-animated-characters-using-character-creator-3-iclone-7

In our latest CRYENGINE Master Class, Roman Perezogin, one of our Junior Technical Designers, takes you step-by-step through the process of creating a character and then importing it into CRYENGINE by using Character Creator 3 and iClone 7 from Reallusion and Adobe Photoshop. The video shows you a practical, professional workflow that you follow along with and apply to your own projects.

Character Creator 3 is a powerful tool which you can use to create high-quality, realistic characters and assets, including a rich feature set which allows you to edit almost everything you create, and even add your own textures with Substance. iClone 7 is a highly-intuitive, real-time animation application that allows you to easily create sequences thanks to its timeline and animation set up. You can download trial versions of both applications from https://www.reallusion.com/.

This tutorial uses both applications to create a character and add facial animation to it, then demonstrates how to import the character into a CRYENGINE level and adjust settings with the material editor. It also shows you how to use Adobe Photoshop, the ubiquitous graphics editor available with a free trial from https://www.adobe.com/, to adjust shaders and the parameters of various character materials.

To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the basics of game development and using the CRYENGINE sandbox. You can also use written documentation in conjunction with this tutorial. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

We hope you find this tutorial useful. If you’re looking for more tutorials, don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity, and we actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/creating-animated-characters-using-character-creator-3-iclone-7 Fri, 10 Jan 2020 16:12:22 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Dungeons & Dragons Tabletop Map]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/dungeons-dragons-tabletop-map

At Crytek, we love games of all kinds and count many Dungeons & Dragons players amongst our ranks. However, CRYENGINE Software Engineer Alexander Klinger decided to take things further by combining his love of D&D with his knowledge of CRYENGINE to create a stunning animated D&D map that runs in a custom tabletop display. We spoke to Alex to find out more about the project, his workflow, and how D&D fans can create a similar map with free CRYENGINE assets. 

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Hey Alex, how did this project come about?

Alex: Some friends and I started a new Dungeons & Dragons campaign, and we wanted to up our map game. We usually just play on ugly hand-drawn maps with basic shapes to represent the scenery and move our miniatures on it. We saw that some people play on digital tabletops, usually just a table with a TV in it, which displays 2D maps or girds to play on. It's a pretty cool setup, so we started to build our table, and it turned out pretty nice. The first time we used it, we just played with random 2D maps that we found online, which worked fairly well, but I felt like we missed a certain wow effect. So I thought I would put my engine knowledge to good use and create some maps in CRYENGINE.

Where did you draw inspiration from?

Alex: Most of the inspiration came from other D&D maps I have seen online but a lot of the layout was determined by our Dungeon Master, the game organizer in charge of creating the details and challenges of a given adventure. He sent me some rough layouts of how he imagined the scenery and where he wanted to create encounters and I started to fill it with life. I wanted the maps to feel as realistic as possible so I had a look at Kingdom Come: Deliverance. Not only was this game made in CRYENGINE but it also has one of the most beautiful and accurate medieval maps I have ever seen.

What tools and workflow did you use to create it?

Alex: I started with the GameSDK since it already has a lot of assets like props and particles which I could use for the map. The GameSDK also comes with some pre-built maps like Woodland, which was the perfect starting point for me. My first step was to build a small asset zoo level where I would collect all the assets I liked which would fit into a D&D fantasy environment. After I realized that I would like a larger variety of assets, I also downloaded the free Ryse and Wilderness assets from the CRYENGINE Marketplace and started to assemble the map. I used pretty much all of the level editing tools CRYENGINE offers like the Vegetation Editor, Terrain Editor, Environment Editor, and more. Creating prefabs and groups of level parts was really helpful since I needed to rearrange the assets to fit the grid and the layout from our Dungeon Master. After the level itself was created and I was happy with the layout, I started to polish, adding particle effects and boids so that the scene looks alive and dynamic.

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Did you need to do anything special to get it working on the tabletop display?

Alex: The map is just a looping video with a grid overlay, so I used Trackview's render sequence tool to generate a two-minute-long sequence of pictures. Then I loaded up those pictures in a video editing tool and generated a video out of it. After a post-process pass, changing the color range, adjusting the brightness and overlaying the grid, the video is pretty much done and ready to play. The only tricky part in the process was to get the camera right. To properly play the game from a top down perspective, the map should be relatively flat with as little perspective distortion as possible, otherwise placing a 2D grid on top of it wouldn't really work. In the end the trick was to use a small FOV and place the camera further away. I could also have used an orthographic projection, but I still wanted to have some sort of depth perception. I'm pretty happy with the result.

Has it enhanced your D&D gaming experience?

Alex: Certainly! First of all it just looks much cooler, seeing your minis jumping over animated rivers or a campfire. Casting realistic moving shadows adds a lot to the atmosphere of the gaming experience, especially if you accompany the map with some ambient sounds and music. It also made combat easier and quicker to play. You immediately have an idea of what your surroundings look like, and also where your character can move. And, of course, it’s been a huge amount of fun to create the maps in CRYENGINE!

Thanks, Alex!

If you’re inspired to create your own D&D map based on this project using free assets from the CRYENGINE Marketplace, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Don’t forget to join the community and our CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity. We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/dungeons-dragons-tabletop-map Mon, 13 Jan 2020 10:22:52 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Get a First Look at Lovecraftian Horror Exploration Game: The Alien Cube]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/get-a-first-look-at-lovecraftian-horror-exploration-game-the-alien-cube

The Alien Cube is a CRYENGINE-powered first-person horror adventure game from Alessandro Guzzo, the developer of The Land of Pain. You can check out The Alien Cube by playing the demo, which is available on Steam today, and we caught up with Alessandro to find out more about the game and his dev process. 

Hey Alessandro! What can players expect in The Alien Cube?

The Alien Cube is a first-person Lovecraftian horror adventure where you play the role of Arthur, a young man whose life is about to change forever. Tormented by dreadful visions, you will explore otherworldly and forbidden places where you will uncover, step-by-step, a terrifying mystery. You will have to survive in dangerous situations across a wide variety of environments as you try to unveil the truth behind a series of strange events.

Where is the game set? 

The game is set in the late 1990s. After discovering a strange object that seems to come from an alien world, you embark on a journey taking in many different locations, such as old crumbling buildings, snowy forests, dark dungeons, and more. Otherworldly and insane environments are waiting to be discovered. You have to be very careful as you will have to face many dangers in these disturbing and unexplored places. 

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What inspired you to make The Alien Cube? 

Lovecraft’s literature was a big source of inspiration. This game, in particular, embraces the fear of the unknown, dark and alien worlds, and terrible hidden realities. Lovecraft’s short story that deals with this concept is From Beyond. Edgar Allan Poe’s literature was also a great source of inspiration, especially some of his short tales like The Pit and the Pendulum. The Alien Cube explores the themes of unexplored universes and alien gods, which I had developed in my previous game, The Land of Pain. Indeed, in The Alien Cube, you will play as Arthur, the nephew of The Land of Pain’s protagonist. 

The Alien Cube is a spiritual sequel to The Land of Pain, as there are aspects in both games that are connected. For example, in The Alien Cube, you will also investigate the history of The Land of Pain’s protagonist, Edgar. However, these are minor connections compared to the main story. The two games are designed to be played separately, as they are focused on two different stories. At the same time, however, there will be interesting connections to discover if you play both.

What is it about Lovecraftian horror that you enjoy so much?

What I enjoy in Lovecraft’s horror is how he can convey a feeling of insignificance that characterizes humanity's place in the universe. I also like his protagonists, usually anti-heroes and solitary individuals. They are often socially detached and tend to be vulnerable. The truth they have to face leads them to insanity, as what the universe hides from humanity should not be seen by anyone. In The Alien Cube, the player can find many of these aspects explored, as well as other themes. 

Is it a solo development, or is there a wider team?

I am the sole developer behind The Alien Cube. However, there are some aspects that I can’t manage by myself, such as translation and voice acting. For those aspects, I’m collaborating with some fantastic people that I want to thank. In particular, I want to thank Francesca, who is helping me with marketing and giving great feedback on the development.

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What did you learn from the development of The Land of Pain, and how has that helped you with this project? 

The Land of Pain was my first game, and my very first experience as a developer. I started from nothing! The Land of Pain allowed me to learn and discover new things, from beginning to end. Even today, I’m learning new things and more efficient methods, essential in this kind of job. The Land of Pain’s development gave me the necessary basis for game development, and now my goal is to make better and more advanced games.

The Land of Pain was my first project with CRYENGINE, and I started its development in late 2014. I chose CRYENGINE because I felt immediately comfortable with creating the environments and the situations I had in mind. As a one-person team, optimizing development time has always been my priority, and with CRYENGINE, I have found this essential feature. 

The high technical quality that you can achieve with CRYENGINE is another important aspect of the engine that has always intrigued me. I’m using all the available features to reach the best quality in every aspect.

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Which CRYENGINE features have helped you with the Alien Cube?

To me, the most useful feature in CRYENGINE is Flowgraph, as it is a very intuitive system to create actions in the game. Also, the material editor is very fast. I’m also using volumetric fog, global illumination, lens flare, and the vegetation editor. All of these features have been very useful in the creation of my projects. The CRYENGINE community was very helpful both in the forums and in Discord. In particular, I want to thank Cry-Flare, who has been very kind and helped me a lot!

The Alien Cube takes advantage of photogrammetry tech. What is your workflow?

Yes, I love this technology as it can bring real objects into the game world with amazing quality. The workflow consists of taking many pictures of an object from different angles, making sure to capture every single detail. The object must have the most uniform light possible, without shadows or direct sunlight. 

When the pictures are ready, they are loaded in a 3D reconstruction program that creates the shape and the texture of the object. At this point, the object is created, but it is not suitable for a game engine, so it will require work to optimize it, for example, by reducing polygons, making a better texture with a normal map, and so on. In The Alien Cube, there will also be objects from Quixel Megascans’ library, which contains many incredibly high-quality models.

Thanks, Alessandro! 

Check out the Alien Cube demo on Steam today. You can also find Alessandro’s first game, The Land of Pain, on Steam. 

 

Are you making something cool with CRYENGINE? Let us know in the comments, on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Don’t forget to join the community and our CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.

Want to work on CRYENGINE? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/get-a-first-look-at-lovecraftian-horror-exploration-game-the-alien-cube Fri, 20 Dec 2019 15:57:34 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Celebrate the holidays with seasonal assets]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/celebrate-the-holidays-with-seasonal-assets

Winter is well and truly here, so we’re casting our eyes over the CRYENGINE Marketplace to pick out some seasonal assets inspired by, or perfect for, the winter period. 

If you’re looking to create a winter wonderland, then you’ll want to check out a range of awesome textures from the aptly named Game Textures. They’ve got you covered with their Windswept Snow, Icy Snowfield, Clumpy Snow, and Snow Swept Cliff Face packs, which are all prepared for physically-based shading, and ideal for a range of effects from a light, holiday season dusting of snow to creating a full icy tundra. 

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Once you’ve created your snowscape, give your players a perfect vantage point with this beautiful, ready-to-go hot air balloon from Qlaud_Yoshima. This asset includes realistic materials, moving cloth, and includes FBX files.

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Of course, you’ll most likely want your players to be able to cross your snow scene on foot too, and the S23 Winter Footsteps Collection from Studio 23 will help you ensure that your level sounds as good as it looks. Featuring 330 high-quality audio Wav files, this pack covers multiple snow and ice footstep types, including 43 loops and sequences. It includes walking, jogging, and running sounds, each with an ambient and clean version, depending on your needs. It’s a highly-flexible and super-organized pack.

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If you want more seasonal sounds, then check out the Christmas Sound Effects Bundle from audiofnx. Including 175 high-quality recordings, this collection includes sleigh bell loops, bells, twinkle sounds, and Christmas ornament sound effects. You can also check out a slimmed-down asset pack featuring 25 of the assets in the bundle in the 25 Christmas Sound Effects Pack.

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We absolutely love the Winter Forest Pack from CGTrader. This collection of gorgeous hand-painted assets includes fences, signs, rocks, and snow-capped trees, ideal for a charming and stylized fantasy winter scene.

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With The Climb out now on Oculus Quest, now’s a great time to download our free asset pack featuring a range of wintry props and more. The collection includes polar bears, arctic foxes, and birds of prey, all with animations, and there is a great range of rock, waterfall, and river assets so you can create a wilderness for them to explore.

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All of these assets and more are available on the CRYENGINE Marketplace. If you pick up an asset that makes a difference for your project, don’t forget to leave a review. And if you’re looking for a specific asset to help you, but somehow can’t find it, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. Don’t forget to join the community and our CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently.

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity. We actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/celebrate-the-holidays-with-seasonal-assets Wed, 18 Dec 2019 16:03:00 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Improve your scenes with HDR skies]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/improve-your-scenes-with-hdr-skies

Discover how to improve your scenes with HDR skies in our new mini-tutorial hosted by Roman Perezogin, one of our Junior Technical Designers, who takes you step-by-step through his workflow for setting up HDR sky textures in CRYENGINE using Photoshop. The video also demonstrates how to create a material file and set up the skybox in the environment editor. And all in under six minutes! You can follow along with this tutorial by visiting HDRI Skies, a provider of high dynamic range full 360° HDRi skydomes, which you can download in 2K resolution for free.

 

 

The tutorial is aimed at users who are already comfortable with using the sandbox. If you are entirely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel.

If you enjoyed this tutorial, you may wish to check out Roman’s mini-tutorial demonstrating his workflow for importing assets into the engine with 3DS Max, showing the import process of complex assets and how to configure them using the engine. 

We hope you find this tutorial useful, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel so you can watch the next video in this series when it’s released. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. 

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/improve-your-scenes-with-hdr-skies Fri, 13 Dec 2019 16:00:39 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[CRYENGINE 5.6.5 hotfix available now]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-5-6-5-hotfix-available-now

We are pleased to let you know that CRYENGINE 5.6.5 is available now from www.CRYENGINE.com and the CRYENGINE Launcher. This is our fifth hotfix since we launched CRYENGINE 5.6 as part of our commitment to improving the engine in response to your feedback. To help us keep making CRYENGINE better for everyone, please continue to let us know your thoughts and comments on the dedicated forum feedback thread.

Highlights in CRYENGINE 5.6.5 include:

  • Fixed: (Volumetric Fog): Fog on light probes - by bringing it's GenerateLightList more in line with its counterpart in TiledLightVolumes.
  • Fixed: Issue with view distance ratios not being refreshed correctly when propagating through attachment hierarchies.
  • Fixed: (Prefab LE): Snapping a hidden prefab to a place will un-hide the brush object inside of it, but keep the UI and helper in the invisible state.

Middleware Updates:

  • Updated to FMOD 2.00.06.
  • Updated to Wwise 2019.1.5.

You can read the full release notes and the known issues for this hotfix here.

CRYENGINE 5.6 was a huge release for us, and when shipping build of this size, inevitably, certain issues and bugs might only appear when the engine is in your hands. This hotfix addresses more issues, but please keep your feedback and suggestions coming on the dedicated forum feedback thread for future updates. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. 

As ever, stay tuned for updates on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter and don’t forget to join the community and our CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel.

Want to work on CRYENGINE? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/cryengine-5-6-5-hotfix-available-now Thu, 12 Dec 2019 15:27:09 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Part Three of our CRYENGINE Physics Constraints Tutorial Series]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/part-three-of-our-cryengine-physics-constraints-tutorial-series

Master advanced physics constraints, including constraining the movement of an object to a 3d mesh or a spline path, in our latest tutorial hosted by our Learning Manager, Brian Dilg. The video takes you step-by-step through advanced techniques using CRYENGINE’s physics system to create complex animations like barrel roll movements in a practical walkthrough. To get the most out of this tutorial, you should be familiar with the concepts of rigid bodies, the basics of physics constraints, including point, line, and spline constraints, and have a working knowledge of the sandbox editor. To get started with the basics of physics constraints, check out part one of this tutorial series. You can use our physics constraints learning documentation in conjunction with this course. If you are completely new to CRYENGINE, we recommend that you download our beginner’s course or watch the tutorial on our YouTube channel. 

We hope you find this tutorial useful. If you’re looking for more tutorials, don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have suggestions for tutorials, let us know on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. 

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/part-three-of-our-cryengine-physics-constraints-tutorial-series Wed, 11 Dec 2019 16:04:05 +0100 Crytek
<![CDATA[Check out GalaxSys, our new CRYENGINE Sample Project]]> https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/check-out-galaxsys-our-new-cryengine-sample-project

Our new sample project, GalaxSys, is available now on CRYENGINE Marketplace. GalaxSys is a vibrant all-action twin-stick shooter and was developed in a short amount of time by just a few people at CRYENGINE. Give the game a whirl and check out the code for yourself to discover how it was put together, expand on it, or re-imagine it as you wish. 

Credits for GalaxSys:

  • Viktor Ikkes: VFX/3D Artist and Level Designer
  • Alex Klinger: Gameplay Programmer and Gameplay Mechanics Designer
  • Christian Schilling: Audio designer/Producer
  • Jeremy Wade: Gameplay Programmer/UI Designer
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We sat down with Alex and Jeremy, two of the four-person dev team who created GalaxSys, to find out more.

Hey, guys! What was your aim with this project?

Alex: I wanted to create something new and fresh, a game that demonstrates how versatile CRYENGINE is and shows how easy it is to create simple games with just a few code files. Furthermore, we wanted to create something easy to pick up and will allow users to understand how the fundamental systems of the engine, such as the physics or entity systems, can be used to create a game. GalaxSys really shows how you can create something simple but fun with relative ease.

Jeremy: Generally, we wanted to showcase the versatility of the engine for creating games in a short dev cycle. The project was passed to me from Alex and Viktor, who did an amazing job. The game was playable, as much as a prototype can be, and looked great. There were a few things that needed to be addressed, which came down mostly to modularity and polish. Over time the game was modularized to the point that we added several new components that would allow even greater flexibility in expanding upon or re-imagining the sample. We want to provide devs with the toolset to create their games in CRYENGINE, and this project will help them do that.

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Where the idea for GalaxSys come from?

Alex: In the beginning, I was just thinking about what we could create that would use most of the systems in the engine in a short dev cycle. Since we already had a TwinStickShooter template for the engine I thought that would be a great start for this project, and I am a big fan of Geometry Wars. After showing Viktor some gameplay, there was little convincing left to be done! Geometry Wars uses particles in its visual style intensively, and that gave us an excellent opportunity to show off PFX2 and some more abstract effects compared to the more realistic ones we have in the GameSDK or Hunt Showdown.

Roughly how long did it take to create GalaxSys?

Alex: In total, I don't think it was more than four work hours on my side. Obviously, the project wasn't complete after that, but the game itself was working, and it had a fully playable game loop. Since I am very familiar with the systems and the engine in general, I was able to create this game very quickly. I would say that a standard user of CRYENGINE would be able to achieve the same thing in a short time frame, maybe one or two days.

Jeremy: The initial prototype by Viktor and Alex only took a handful of hours. Then we decided to polish it up and remove as much hard-coded logic as possible for developers and designers, including those who may not be programmers themselves. Then we began to polish and expand upon the sample game, implementing several new generic components and enabling much greater flexibility to allow developers to customize and expand upon the sample as much as they want.

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Which core CRYENGINE systems did you use in this project?

Alex: I used a lot of the default components provided by the engine, like the constraint, mesh, and particle components. Components are a real time-saver, and they also provide a lot of functionality. Another feature worth highlighting is the particle system. Inspired by Geometry Wars, we created a lot of different stylish particles and combined them with the physics system to create the distortion effect in the background particle gird.

What tips do you have for anyone who wants to investigate this project?

Alex: I think the best way to learn from the sample is to start at a high level and then work down to the details of it. First, begin with the level itself have a look at the entities in the scene so you can get an idea of how the game is composed, and then dig deeper into the implementation of the components and entities. In the future, we will provide some general documentation for the project, which will give a good overview as well. You could also use this project as a base and customize it to your needs, and use the principles and systems that you can see in the project to create something similar.

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Jeremy: For users who want to investigate the code itself, you will see when opening the project in Visual Studio that most of the code is housed inside more generic components. There are many comments in the code to help provide a quick understanding of the logic behind it so that you can pick up the concepts faster. I would take a look at the components first and get an idea of how each component functions. Most of the more specific logic will be housed inside the Schematyc Graphs so it can be changed without modifying code. The code has excellent variety, tying into several different systems with differing complexity with each component, so there is a lot you can learn here, even in such a small and straightforward project. For non-coders we advise checking out the entities and seeing which components they use and how the graphs are laid out. Start tinkering with values and then create your own logic, expanding and changing the sample how you wish.

Cheers, guys!

We hope you find GalaxSys fun and useful, and we look forward to your feedback on the forum, or via Facebook and Twitter. You can ask questions, pick up tips and tricks, and more by joining our community and the CRYENGINE development team over on our official CRYENGINE Discord channel. If you find a bug in the engine, please report it directly on GitHub, which helps us to process the issue quickly and efficiently. 

Are you looking for your next career move? At Crytek, we value diversity and actively encourage people from all kinds of backgrounds and experience levels to apply to our open positions, so join us over at LinkedIn and check out our careers page.

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https://www.cryengine.com/news/view/check-out-galaxsys-our-new-cryengine-sample-project Thu, 05 Dec 2019 17:41:43 +0100 Crytek